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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband must aim to reduce inequality, not the size of your gas bill (Daily Telegraph)

Economist Thomas Piketty points the way for the Labour Party to win back votes from its traditional supporters, says Mary Riddell.  

2. Labour would put schools in local hands (Guardian)

The party's education policy would ensure local oversight of free schools and academies to drive up standards, says David Blunkett.

3. Only shock-and-awe sanctions will hurt Putin (Times)

War in Ukraine is growing closer, writes Roger Boyes. The west may have to accept the pain of lost business.

4. A vote for UKIP would be a vote for the very worst of Thatcherism (Daily Mirror)

There is only one party which truly understands the cost-of-living crisis, says Ed Miliband. 

5. David Cameron: intimations of political mortality (Guardian)

The prime minister's remarks on governing in a new hung parliament are a small sign of his wider political weakness, says a Guardian editorial. 

6. A ripple of hope in a stagnant world (Financial Times)

Excess supply and low interest rates go hand in hand and could put the recovery at risk, warns Martin Wolf. 

7. The rent racket: tenants are trapped in a game of Monopoly that won't end (Guardian

Private landlords enjoy an absurd level of power over tenants, writes Zoe Williams. Yet they reject even minimal regulation.

8. A huge UK-based company is the subject of a takeover by an even bigger US-based company. Should we be worried? (Independent)

If the Pfizer deal goes through, this isn't just yet another story of a British company selling out to a foreign one, writes Hamish McRae. It's about tax, too.

9. Cyril Smith and the ghost of politics future (Times)

The corrupt control of local institutions by a powerful celebrity politician could make a comeback in our times, says Daniel Finkelstein.

10. So why isn’t it racist when other parties talk about controlling immigration? (Independent)

The reason Labour is losing support to Ukip is because the working class have been hardest hit by Labour’s disastrous policies, says Nigel Farage.