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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Booming Britain running smoothly? Don't believe the hype just yet (Guardian)

Growth figures will show a rise in output, but despite Bank of England repairs, the economic model may yet run out of road, warns Larry Elliott. 

2. Don’t lose heart. There are ways of defeating Ukip (Times)

Trust the people, says John McTernan. They don’t get it wrong. They know a bad argument when they hear it.

3. China’s crisis is coming (Financial Times)

The longer the economy stays unbalanced, the worse the outcome will be, says Prasenjit Basu. 

4. Stand with Lenny Henry, not just against Ukip's bigots (Guardian)

It is easy to get angry over racism when it is overt, but let's not forget the scandal that gave rise to the Henwood outburst, says Owen Jones.

5. Why Janet Yellen and the Federal Reserve should make workers’ wage growth into a target (Independent)

Wage inflation should be used as an additional target for monetary policy by the US central bank, says David Blanchflower. 

6. To Birmingham and Beyond (Times)

The case for new high-speed rail links between London and the north is strong, says a Times editorial. The interests of a few must not derail it.

7. There’s a simple solution to this Euro-elections sham (Daily Telegraph)

Westminster politicians are well placed to do a good job in Brussels and Strasbourg, writes Boris Johnson.

8. America’s compulsive urge to regulate (Financial Times)

With its spider’s web of local and federal rules, the US is swinging back to intrusion, writes Edward Luce.

9. Abbas’s recognition that the Holocaust was a ‘heinous crime’ was a goodwill gesture Netanyahu is ungracious to spurn (Independent)

If progress is ever to be made towards ending the conflict, this dialogue has to stop, says an Independent editorial. 

10. Ten years of Clegg? Let's all get ready to emigrate (Daily Mail)

More than with most senior politicians, you feel the political positions he adopts accord with European rather than UK tastes, writes Peter McKay. 

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"