Show Hide image

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Booming Britain running smoothly? Don't believe the hype just yet (Guardian)

Growth figures will show a rise in output, but despite Bank of England repairs, the economic model may yet run out of road, warns Larry Elliott. 

2. Don’t lose heart. There are ways of defeating Ukip (Times)

Trust the people, says John McTernan. They don’t get it wrong. They know a bad argument when they hear it.

3. China’s crisis is coming (Financial Times)

The longer the economy stays unbalanced, the worse the outcome will be, says Prasenjit Basu. 

4. Stand with Lenny Henry, not just against Ukip's bigots (Guardian)

It is easy to get angry over racism when it is overt, but let's not forget the scandal that gave rise to the Henwood outburst, says Owen Jones.

5. Why Janet Yellen and the Federal Reserve should make workers’ wage growth into a target (Independent)

Wage inflation should be used as an additional target for monetary policy by the US central bank, says David Blanchflower. 

6. To Birmingham and Beyond (Times)

The case for new high-speed rail links between London and the north is strong, says a Times editorial. The interests of a few must not derail it.

7. There’s a simple solution to this Euro-elections sham (Daily Telegraph)

Westminster politicians are well placed to do a good job in Brussels and Strasbourg, writes Boris Johnson.

8. America’s compulsive urge to regulate (Financial Times)

With its spider’s web of local and federal rules, the US is swinging back to intrusion, writes Edward Luce.

9. Abbas’s recognition that the Holocaust was a ‘heinous crime’ was a goodwill gesture Netanyahu is ungracious to spurn (Independent)

If progress is ever to be made towards ending the conflict, this dialogue has to stop, says an Independent editorial. 

10. Ten years of Clegg? Let's all get ready to emigrate (Daily Mail)

More than with most senior politicians, you feel the political positions he adopts accord with European rather than UK tastes, writes Peter McKay. 

Show Hide image

It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.