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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Obama’s false choice: war-war or jaw-jaw (Financial Times)

War – cold or hot – against Russia is not an answer but neither is pointless discussion, says Philip Stephens. 

2. Does Boris belong in the zombie parliament? (Times)

Life is draining out of the Commons, writes Rafael Behr. The real action is elsewhere – with the likes of Nigel Farage and Alex Salmond.

3. £5m for the Barclays boss is disgusting. But so is £71 for the unemployed (Guardian)

Nearly 500 Barclays staff are paid more than £1m, writes Polly Toynbee. Meanwhile, those hit by the recession continue to suffer. This can't go on.

4. Strip banks of the power to create money (Financial Times)

The giant hole at the heart of our market economies needs to be plugged, writes Martin Wolf. 

5. Why the Tories care more about bins than Brussels (Daily Telegraph)

Conservatives are more interested in the local elections because they are thinking ahead to the 2015 campaign, says Isabel Hardman. 

6. The NHS needs a life-saving idea – how about a health tax? (Guardian)

We rail against general taxation yet clamour for the NHS to be replenished, writes Peter Wilby. What's needed is a bold solution.

7. Cameron’s green credentials are being blown away (Times)

The party’s position on wind farms is inconsistent with other energy policies, says Peter Franklin. 

8. Social media is now the biggest jihadi training camp of them all (Daily Telegraph)

Unable to control online radicalism, police have little option but to plead with Muslim women to dissuade their menfolk from enlisting, writes Fraser Nelson. 

9.  Pope John XXIII’s ‘missing’ second miracle is that he knew he was fallible (Independent)

Cardinals never know what will become of a cleric once he dons, Clark Kent-like, those papal robes, writes Peter Popham. 

10. Cornwall is far more than just a county - and now it’s official (Daily Telegraph)

This week’s decision not only recognises our glorious past, but offers hope for the future, says Petroc Trelawney. 

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Gender pay gap: women do not choose to be paid less than men

Care work isn’t going anywhere – and it’s about time we recognised which half of the population is doing it, unpaid.

Is it just me, or does Mansplain The Pay Gap Day get earlier every year? It’s not even November and already men up and down the land are hard at work responding to the latest so-called “research” suggesting that women suffer discrimination when it comes to promotions and pay. 

Poor men. It must be a thankless task, having to do this year in, year out, while women continue to feel hard done to on the basis of entirely misleading statistics. Yes, women may earn an average of 18 per cent less than men. Yes, male managers may be 40 per cent more likely than female managers to be promoted. Yes, the difference in earnings between men and women may balloon once children are born. But let’s be honest, this isn’t about discrimination. It’s all about choice.

Listen, for instance, to Mark Littlewood, director general of the Institute of Economic Affairs:

“When people make the decision to go part time, either for familial reasons or to gain a better work-life balance, this can impact further career opportunities but it is a choice made by the individual - men and women alike.”

Women can hardly expect to be earning the same as men if we’re not putting in the same number of hours, can we? As Tory MP Philip Davies has said: “feminist zealots really do want women to have their cake and eat it.” Since we’re far more likely than men to work part-time and/or to take time off to care for others, it makes perfect sense for us to be earning less.

After all, it’s not as though the decisions we make are influenced by anything other than innate individual preferences, arising from deep within our pink, fluffy brains. And it’s not as though the tasks we are doing outside of the traditional workplace have any broader social, cultural or economic value whatsoever.

To listen to the likes of Littlewood and Davies, you’d think that the feminist argument regarding equal pay started and ended with “horrible men are paying us less to do the same jobs because they’re mean”. I mean, I think it’s clear that many of them are doing exactly that, but as others have been saying, repeatedly, it’s a bit more complicated than that. The thing our poor mansplainers tend to miss is that there is a problem in how we are defining work that is economically valuable in the first place. Women will never gain equal pay as long as value is ascribed in accordance with a view of the world which sees men as the default humans.

As Katrine Marçal puts it in Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner?, “in the same way that there is a ‘second sex’, there is a ‘second economy’”:

“The work that is traditionally carried out by men is what counts. It defines the economic world view. Women’s work is ‘the other’. Everything that he doesn’t do but that he is dependent on so he can do what he does.”

By which Marçal means cooking, cleaning, nursing, caring – the domestic tasks which used to be referred to as “housework” before we decided that was sexist. Terms such as “housework” belong to an era when women were forced to do all the domestic tasks by evil men who told them it was their principal role in life. It’s not like that now, at least not as far as our mansplaining economists are concerned. Nowadays when women do all the domestic tasks it’s because they’ve chosen “to gain a better work-life balance.” Honestly. We can’t get enough of those unpaid hours spent in immaculate homes with smiling, clean, obedient children and healthy, Werther’s Original-style elderly relatives. It’s not as though we’re up to our elbows in the same old shit as before. Thanks to the great gods Empowerment and Choice, those turds have been polished out of existence. And it’s not as though reproductive coercion, male violence, class, geographic location, social conditioning or cultural pressures continue to influence our empowered choices in any way whatsoever. We make all our decisions in a vacuum (a Dyson, naturally).

Sadly, I think this is what many men genuinely believe. It’s what they must tell themselves, after all, in order to avoid feeling horribly ashamed at the way in which half the world’s population continues to exploit the bodies and labour of the other half. The gender pay gap is seen as something which has evolved naturally because – as Marçal writes – “the job market is still largely defined by the idea that humans are bodiless, sexless, profit-seeking individuals without family or context”. If women “choose” to behave as though this is not the case, well, that’s their look-out (that the economy as a whole benefits from such behaviour since it means workers/consumers continue to be born and kept alive is just a happy coincidence).

I am not for one moment suggesting that women should therefore be “liberated” to make the same choices as men do. Rather, men should face the same restrictions and be expected to meet the same obligations as women. Care work isn’t going anywhere. There will always be people who are too young, too old or too sick to take care of themselves. Rebranding  this work the “life” side of the great “work-life balance” isn’t fooling anyone.

So I’m sorry, men. Your valiant efforts in mansplaining the gender pay gap have been noted. What a tough job it must be. But next time, why not change a few nappies, wash a few dishes and mop up a few pools of vomit instead? Go on, live a little. You’ve earned it. 

Glosswitch is a feminist mother of three who works in publishing.