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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Obama’s false choice: war-war or jaw-jaw (Financial Times)

War – cold or hot – against Russia is not an answer but neither is pointless discussion, says Philip Stephens. 

2. Does Boris belong in the zombie parliament? (Times)

Life is draining out of the Commons, writes Rafael Behr. The real action is elsewhere – with the likes of Nigel Farage and Alex Salmond.

3. £5m for the Barclays boss is disgusting. But so is £71 for the unemployed (Guardian)

Nearly 500 Barclays staff are paid more than £1m, writes Polly Toynbee. Meanwhile, those hit by the recession continue to suffer. This can't go on.

4. Strip banks of the power to create money (Financial Times)

The giant hole at the heart of our market economies needs to be plugged, writes Martin Wolf. 

5. Why the Tories care more about bins than Brussels (Daily Telegraph)

Conservatives are more interested in the local elections because they are thinking ahead to the 2015 campaign, says Isabel Hardman. 

6. The NHS needs a life-saving idea – how about a health tax? (Guardian)

We rail against general taxation yet clamour for the NHS to be replenished, writes Peter Wilby. What's needed is a bold solution.

7. Cameron’s green credentials are being blown away (Times)

The party’s position on wind farms is inconsistent with other energy policies, says Peter Franklin. 

8. Social media is now the biggest jihadi training camp of them all (Daily Telegraph)

Unable to control online radicalism, police have little option but to plead with Muslim women to dissuade their menfolk from enlisting, writes Fraser Nelson. 

9.  Pope John XXIII’s ‘missing’ second miracle is that he knew he was fallible (Independent)

Cardinals never know what will become of a cleric once he dons, Clark Kent-like, those papal robes, writes Peter Popham. 

10. Cornwall is far more than just a county - and now it’s official (Daily Telegraph)

This week’s decision not only recognises our glorious past, but offers hope for the future, says Petroc Trelawney. 

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.