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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Cameron and Ed Miliband don't matter as much as they think (Guardian)

Both leaders are hiring Barack Obama aides for the 2015 election, but Britain will be voting for a party, not a president or a personality, writes Steve Richards. 

2. An equal society will not hinder growth (Financial Times)

Inequality damages the economy and efforts to remedy it are, on the whole, not harmful, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Whisper it, but Obamacare may be working (Times)

The health policy has been a disaster so far, but it could turn into an historic achievement, writes Justin Webb.

4. Pastor Cameron has played his hand - now it’s over to Dr Miliband (Daily Telegraph)

A community-driven health service would do the Labour Party’s prospects the power of good, says Mary Riddell. 

5. Time to invest in Britain’s future (Financial Times)

Fine words on infrastructure spending are not enough, says an FT editorial.

6. Panicked Tories are risking the UK’s future (Daily Telegraph)

Alex Salmond’s separatist bunkum on Scottish independence has triggered a case of the Westminster wobbles, writes Alan Cochrane. 

7. Let's make industrial action bigger than striking teachers (Guardian)

Parents sympathise with teachers' grievances, so they need to work out a way to take complementary action, says Zoe Williams.

8. Sacking David Moyes made no sense at all (Times)

You cannot judge a manager over a mere nine months – and you shouldn’t judge an organisation by its leader anyway, says Daniel Finkelstein.

9. Calling Ukip’s posters ‘racist’ is yet another example of shameful Westminster evasion (Independent)

It’s a classic tactic by those who want to shut down this debate, says Nigel Farage.

10. Gordon Brown: union man (Guardian)

Former PM has challenged the idea that politics and society can be neatly separated, by emphasising the question of pensions in the Scotland debate, says a Guardian editorial.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.