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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Protect Britain in a two-speed Europe (Financial Times)

States outside the eurozone should not be at disadvantage in the EU, write George Osborne and Wolfgang Schäuble.

2. Children don’t earn their inheritance. Tax it (Times)

A fair society would let people keep as much of their earnings as possible but take a cut from property and land, says Philip Collins. 

3. Osborne must not run scared of housing (Daily Telegraph)

If the Chancellor is charging up the nation’s credit card, he should spend it on property, says Jeremy Warner. 

4. Farage's TV debate has lit the European touchpaper – are we in or out? (Guardian)

Britain is a step closer to leaving Europe this week, writes Polly Toynbee. It is high time all who fear an exit from the union spoke out against the liars.

5. Only one person is laughing at the Farage-Clegg EU pantomime (Daily Telegraph)

The PM is offering a grown-up discussion on radical reform of the European Union, along with the Germans and Dutch, says Fraser Nelson. 

6. We should thank Putin for one thing - the west is once again the West (Independent)

Thanks to Mr Putin it is experiencing a frisson of unity it has not known for a long time, writes Peter Popham. 

7. Why foxhunting has become an unspeakable topic (Daily Telegraph)

A reluctance to address the contentious issue of foxhunting is dividing the Tory party, says Isabel Hardman. 

8. Labour is part of the problem, not the solution (Guardian)

Its rhetoric may be softer than the Tories', but the party still puts profit before people, says Ken Loach. Left Unity offers a new voice.

9. Osborne had to aid spenders over savers (Financial Times)

The Chancellor’s plans, if implemented, mean turning the government into a substantial net saver, writes Martin Wolf. 

10. Price of Power (Times)

Energy suppliers say that a competition inquiry would interfere with investment plans, but it must go ahead, says a Times editorial.