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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. One by one, Labour is losing the arguments (Times)

Because Ed Miliband never apologised for overspending he may never convince voters that he’ll keep control of their taxes, says Philip Collins. 

2. Older people vote – that's why George Osborne's budget is for them (Guardian)

Less than half our younger generation go to the polls, writes Polly Toynbee. So it's no surprise the chancellor is increasingly hanging them out to dry.

3. Russia’s test for America’s odd couple (Financial Times)

Ukraine presents both danger and opportunity to the analyst Obama and the activist Kerry, says Philip Stephens. 

4. The Budget brings out the worst in Labour thinking (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband and Ed Balls decided to bow out of debating any of the actual announcements - preferring to talk about previous Budgets, writes Isabel Hardman. 

5. Popular Funds (Times)

The Chancellor is right to trust people with their own money when it comes to pensions, says a Times editorial. 

6. Politics is in new territory after George Osborne’s pensions revolution (Daily Telegraph)

The zero era of cheap debt endures, but the welfare state may never be quite the same again, says Fraser Nelson. 

7. Tourism overwhelms the world's historic places, but pays no dues (Guardian)

As Venice overturns a ban on giant cruise liners, it is clear that the places people flock to are incapable of preserving themselves, writes Simon Jenkins. 

8. This Spanish initiative should be a lesson to us all (Independent)

Diasporas are a terrible menace, as the Israelis know to their cost, writes Peter Popham. 

9. Bumpy ride for the makers as Budget's lack of consistency could hinder long-term investments (Daily Mail)

If there is a criticism to be made about Osborne’s Budget for the makers it is that it lacks consistency, says Alex Brummer. 

10. Pensioners will have the freedom to spend their savings as they wish – but where will this ‘free, impartial’ advice come from? (Independent)

The Treasury must have remembered the mis-selling scandals of the mid-1990s, writes Andreas Whittam Smith. 

New Statesman
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.