Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband has a cunning plan: win power and then give it away (Daily Telegraph)

With big spending cuts inevitable after the next election, Labour’s new localism makes economic sense, says Mary Riddell. 

2. Aid money can’t work magic here – but it can overseas (Times)

More should be spent on flood management schemes in Britain, but don’t take it from the aid budget, says Tim Montgomerie. 

3. Enslave the robots and free the poor (Financial Times)

The prospect of far better lives depends on how the gains are produced and distributed, writes Martin Wolf. 

4. For devolution to work, we need talent outside London (Independent)

A century ago, civic leaders in cities and towns outside London had a power, influence and prestige comparable to the government in Westminster, writes Oliver Wright. 

5. Floods happen sometimes: the blame game is for show (Guardian)

Cameron may have rushed to the rescue, writes Simon Jenkins. But the truth is the government cannot insulate us from every evil under the sun.

6. Britain shouldn’t copy the xenophobic Swiss (Times)

The EU reaction to the immigration vote may indicate how much UK renegotiation is possible, writes Roger Boyes. 

7. The floods: coping strategy (Guardian)

David Cameron was keen to show he was a Gerhard Schröder and not a George W Bush, says a Guardian editorial. 

8. A fall guy for the floods comes out fighting (Daily Telegraph)

Lord Smith and the Environment Agency have been unfairly hung out to dry, says Geoffrey Lean. 

9. Smoking in cars: the hidden agenda behind the ban (Guardian)

The MPs who can't bear to see children in smoky cars but are unmoved by their poverty are simply demonising poor parents, says Zoe Williams. 

10. Political appointments require honesty (Financial Times)

Without robust safeguards, our institutions could be weakened, writes Patrick Diamond.

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Tissues and issues for Labour: Corbynite celebrity Charlotte Church votes Plaid Cymru

The singer, who championed Corbyn's leadership, has voted for Labour's rivals in the Welsh Assembly election.

Charlotte Church, hot on the anti-auserity campaign trail and a regular at pro-Corbyn rallies, has voted for Plaid Cymru.

Here is her tweet supporting Labour's rivals, on the day of the Welsh Assembly elections:

The singer's vote suggests she has fallen out of love with Corbyn; she had previously made her support for the Labour leader known by performing at "Jeremy Corbyn for PM" fundraisers for him, and writing an endorsement of his leadership:

"The inverse of Nigel Farage, he appears to be a cool-headed, honest, considerate man, one of the few modern politicians who doesn’t seem to have been trained in neuro-linguistic programming, unconflicted in his political views, and abstemious in his daily life. He is one of the only politicians of note that seems to truly recognise the dire inequality that exists in this country today and actually have a problem with it. There is something inherently virtuous about him, and that is a quality that can rally the support of a lot of people, and most importantly, a lot of young people. With the big three zero on the horizon for me, I don’t know if I still count as a “young person”. What I can say is that for the first time in my adult life there is a politician from a mainstream party who shares my views and those of most people I know, and also has a chance of actually doing something to create a shift in the paradigm, from corporate puppetry to conscientious societal representation."

And, as Guido points out, Church is not the only celebrity Corbyn champion who has witheld support for Labour today. The actor Emma Thompson, who backed Corbyn for Labour leader, has endorsed the Women's Equality Party in the London mayoral election.

I'm a mole, innit.