Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What a fairer Scotland would look like (Independent)

Despite its progressive rhetoric, the SNP would hand big business a mighty cheque, writes Owen Jones.

2. Three cheers for Tory rebels, the real loyalists (Times)

Downing Street expects unswerving obedience, but without the awkward squad we’d be at war – and have dearer petrol, writes Tm Montgomerie.

3. A broken union would unsettle Northern Ireland (Financial Times)

A Scottish Yes vote would open constitutional question at a delicate time, writes Jonathan Powell.

4. We need a counterweight to City and corporate power (Guardian)

Any further weakening of Labour's links with the unions will only deepen the crisis of representation in the political system, says Seumas Milne.

5. As an island nation, we will in the end have to accept that the sea will continue to reshape our landscape (Independent)

It is unrealistic to fortify the whole of the south west and flood defences obstruct open views, writes Mary Dejevsky.

6. We may soon learn France's real role in the Rwanda genocide (Guardian)

In a milestone court case in Paris, unprecedented testimony could reveal the Elysée's links to the 1994 génocidaires, writes Linda Melvern.

7. Carney must avoid more unforced error (Financial Times)

The BoE hitched its wagon to unemployment when what it really cared about was recovery, writes Chris Giles.

8. The Education Secretary is right to take on teacher 'Blobbledegook’ (Daily Telegraph)

Michael Gove takes the outdated view that teaching and learning is the job description of schools, writes Allison Pearson. He deserves all our support.

9. Payment Protection (Times)

Reducing the national debt is not optional for Britain; it is essential to sustainable recovery, argues a Times editorial.

10. Bitcoin is more than a speculators’ currency (Financial Times)

People could gain ownership rights to digital goods similar to physical ones, writes John Gapper.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.