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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A Tory pact with Ukip would bring disaster (Guardian)

The Conservatives must reach out to win in 2015 – but if they are to be a workers' party a deal with Nigel Farage would be toxic, says David Skelton. 

2. Cameron would be mad to rule out coalition (Times)

Politicians cannot ignore the verdict of voters by refusing to work with other parties in the event of a hung parliament, says Daniel Finkelstein. 

3. Currency unknowns weigh on Scotland (Financial Times)

Whatever is said about sterling, there has to be a plan B and that starts with a Scots pound, says John Kay.

4. PIE, the NCCL and Harriet Harman: why she was right not to apologise (Guardian)

The Daily Mail's attempt to destroy the deputy Labour leader's reputation is McCarthyite, says Zoe Williams. 

5. Germany and the UK need one another (Independent)

Germany exemplifies economic virtue and we exemplify economic vice, writes Hamish McRae. 

6. Japan needs much more of the same (Financial Times)

The effort is showing signs of success but requires renewed vigour, writes Adam Posen.

7. I’m immensely looking forward to saying: ‘I don’t agree with Nick Clegg’ (Independent)

This debate will make sure that the European elections are contested on proper, EU-related issues, says Nigel Farage. 

8. Merkel comes to Little England (Financial Times)

Britain’s eurosceptic obsession means it is losing clout, says an FT editorial. 

9. Maidan, Ukraine … Tahrir, Egypt … the square symbolises failure, not hope (Guardian)

The lesson of Egypt for Ukraine is that defiant crowds may destroy an old regime – but they seldom build a new one, writes Simon Jenkins. 

10. How the name game can break a political idea (Times)

The community charge sounded as if we were all in it together but the poll tax was an invitation to the peasants’ revolt, writes Philip Collins. 

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.