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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This is no recovery, this is a bubble – and it will burst (Guardian)

With policymakers unwilling to introduce tough regulation, we're heading for trouble, says Ha-Joon Chang. 

2. A battle over Ukraine can be avoided (Financial Times)

To stop the country being torn apart its fate must be decided by the Ukrainian people, writes Gideon Rachman. 

3. Mrs Merkel can’t give Cameron what he needs (Times)

Germany’s Chancellor lacks the political freedom to agree the kind of renegotiation Tory Eurosceptics hunger for, says Rachel Sylvester.

4. Why are Eurosceptics still so gloomy? (Independent)

Those who insisted Britain must not join the euro have achieved all that they wanted, writes Steve Richards.

5.  David Cameron’s election gamble could electrify British politics (Daily Telegraph)

A "no deals" promise would be a rallying cry to the right, says Benedict Brogan. 

6. Dear Rebecca Adlington, they're the ugly ones (Guardian)

This is my message to the best British swimmer of her generation, writes Laurie Penny. If you've had a "nose shrink", it's OK. I've got your back.

7. Cameron must not dampen this Eurosceptic momentum (Guardian)

 If Alternative für Deutschland wants to join the Tories in Europe, it should be allowed to, no matter what Merkel thinks, says Paul Goodman. 

8. We misjudge Merkel’s vim for EU reform (Financial Times)

The real error is to overrate her capacity to deliver change, even if she wanted it, says Janan Ganesh. 

9. Salmond has to answer some serious questions (Daily Telegraph)

Scotland's First Minister is uncomfortable confronting certain policy areas, but they need to be addressed, says a Telegraph editorial. 

10. Piers Morgan did gun control more harm than good (Times)

In the US, weapons co-exist with a peacefulness that puts Britain to shame, says Justin Webb. 

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Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell a minister

The move is revealed in Ed Balls' new book.

Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell, a sports minister. Campbell had served as Tony Blair’s press chief from 1994 to 2003, Ed Balls has revealed.

Although the move fell through, Campbell would have been one of a number of high-profile ministerial appointments, usually through the Lords, made by Brown during his tenure at 10 Downing Street.

Other unusual appointments included the so-called “Goats” appointed in 2007, part of what Brown dubbed “the government of all the talents”, in which Ara Darzi, a respected surgeon, Mark Malloch-Brown, formerly a United Nations diplomat,  Alan West, a former admiral, Paul Myners, a  successful businessman, and Digby Jones, former director-general of the CBI, took ministerial posts and seats in the Lords. While Darzi, West and Myners were seen as successes on Whitehall, Jones quit the government after a year and became a vocal critic of both Brown’s successors as Labour leader, Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn.

The story is revealed in Ed Balls’ new book, Speaking Out, a record of his time as a backroom adviser and later Cabinet and shadow cabinet minister until the loss of his seat in May 2015. It is published 6 September.