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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Climate change deniers have grasped that markets can't fix the climate (Guardian)

The refusal to accept global warming is driven by corporate interests and the fear of what it will cost to try to stop it, says Seumas Milne. 

2. We're letting Putin win in the Ukraine (Daily Telegraph)

Ukrainians have been betrayed by the failure of a weak and divided west to stand up to the Kremlin, says Edward Lucas.

3. Alex Salmond and co are acting like spoilt children (Guardian)

The inadequacy of the SNP's engagement with serious issues like currency and Europe suggests they suspect the game is up, writes Martin Kettle. 

4. The US has bullied our banks into handing over a billion dollars (Daily Telegraph)

Quietly and without notice, Britain has surrendered control over its trade with Iran, writes Peter Oborne.

5. The drug we ignore that kills thousands (Independent)

We need to address the lack of funding for dealing with alcohol compared with other drugs, says Owen Jones.

6. Labour is impatient for an NHS disaster (Times)

Jeremy Hunt hasn’t got money to throw around but he will urge voters to look at Wales and realise it could be worse, writes Tim Montgomerie.

7. Washington rues the Abe it wished for (Financial Times)

The US fears that Japan’s departure from postwar pacifism will provoke Beijing, writes David Pilling. 

8. David Cameron and Tony Abbott are proving there’s life without spin (Daily Telegraph)

Both here and Down Under, the public are quite happy to hear less from their PMs, writes Sue Cameron. 

9. Canadian air freshens fusty Britain (Financial Times)

A non-Briton as head of the BoE accentuates the openness of the economy, says Patrick Jenkins.

10. Danish hypocrisy over animal welfare takes the biscuit (Times)

"Animal rights before religion" might be easier to accept if Denmark didn’t have such an intensive livestock industry, writes Peter Franklin. 

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.