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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Smart Alex Salmond has had a nasty run-in with reality (Daily Telegraph)

The latest assault from London on keeping the pound and Brussels on joining the EU has left the SNP leader bruised and battered, writes Alan Cochrane. 

2. With seven months to go to the Scottish referendum, the scaremongering has begun (Guardian)

It is simply not true that an independent Scotland would get no place in the EU or a currency union, says Angus Roxburgh. We need facts not scare tactics.

3. Clegg may be batting his eyelashes at Labour, but he won't turn a cold shoulder on the Tories (Independent)

The key issue in any future negotiations for a coalition is the precise context in which they take place, not Clegg’s politics, writes Steve Richards. 

4. How we ended up paying farmers to flood our homes (Guardian)

This government let the farming lobby rip up the rulebook on soil protection – and now we are suffering the consequences, says George Monbiot.

5. The storms reveal how little governments can do (Financial Times)

We have come to see the state as omnipotent in the face of any problem, writes Janan Ganesh. 

6. Cameron's student visa policy is a disastrous own goal (Guardian)

The prime minister's careless immigration pledge is putting off some of our brightest visitors – and damaging Britain, says Timothy Garton Ash.

7. Scotland can be a model for how to split (Financial Times)

There are remarkably few examples of nations breaking up in a civilised way, writes Gideon Rachman. 

8. Salmond’s case for keeping sterling is bluster and abuse (Times)

By the SNP’s logic Britain should adopt the dollar, writes John McTernan. 

9. Fashion is one of the most hyper-capitalist businesses (Guardian)

Haute couture is one of the very few businesses allowed to present itself as not being wholly about commerce, but the facts say otherwise, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

10. Clegg’s Dangerous Shift (Times)

In his attempt to woo the left, the Deputy Prime Minister risks losing voters in southern and rural constituencies, says a Times editorial. 

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.