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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Failing elites threaten our future (Financial Times)

Leaders richly rewarded for mediocrity cannot be relied upon when things go wrong, writes Martin Wolf. 

2. Ed Miliband should come clean – the rich will have to pay more (Daily Telegraph)

A promise to reinstate the top 50p tax band and fund child care would be a good start, says Mary Riddell. 

3. Why A&E departments are fighting for their life (Guardian)

The marketisation of the NHS pits hospital against hospital, and specialism against specialism, says Allyson Pollock. The whole service is suffering, not just A&E.

4. Benefits Street is a challenge for the right (Times)

As this brilliant TV programme suggests, vulnerable people need help to break the cycle of dependence, says Daniel Finkelstein. 

5. France was described as the ‘sick man of Europe’ in the past but returned to health when a Socialist President changed his policies (Independent)

The parallels between the François then and the François now are uncanny, says Hamish McRae.

6. The bluster of al-Qaeda hides failure (Financial Times)

Policy should focus less on the jihadis and more on the conditions that engender them, says David Gardner.

7. America has had the guts to go after banking’s rogues (Times)

UK regulators believe that prosecuting banks would be destabilising, writes Ross Clark. 

8. The squeezed middle deserves far better (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron has to come up with an agenda that will see those suffering from that “protracted squeeze” benefit from the recovery, says a Telegraph editorial. 

9. Cost of living crisis vaporised as inflation falls (Daily Mail)

Labour’s knee-jerk response to every set of economic numbers may soon need revising, says Alex Brummer. 

10. Hollande's private life is the least of his problems (Guardian)

The president should be regretting not his personal follies but the failure of the French economic model, writes Simon Jenkins.