Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Europe's left has seen how capitalism can bite back (Guardian)

Social democrats wrongly thought the reforms they won were won for good, says Leo Panitch. In Greece, the lesson has been learned by Syriza.

2. The tide is rising for America’s libertarians (Financial Times)

The new spirit in a rising climate of anti-politics has become an attitude, rather than a movement, writes Edward Luce.

3. State snooping will hit Britain in the pocket (Times)

Distrust of mass surveillance could spark a damaging exodus of IT companies, warns David Davies.

4. The many frailties of Britain’s recovery (Financial Times)

Sustained growth requires rising incomes and investment, says an FT editorial. 

5. Ed Balls flirting with Nick Clegg is bad politics for Labour (Daily Mirror)

Playing footsie with the Deputy PM is a dangerous admission of doubt in Labour’s upper echelons, says Kevin Maguire. 

6. The ‘flowers’ of the Arab Spring are so distracting that Ariel Sharon’s death has barely raised a whimper (Independent)

For years, Iraqis have been telling me that they prefer ‘security’ to ‘anarchy’, writes Robert Fisk. 

7. The west was behind this Chinese atrocity (Times)

A green idea based on a false premise, the one-child policy was the result of mathematical modelling, writes Matt Ridley.

8. The eurozone needs nurture not neglect (Financial Times)

Quantitative easing is still my preferred choice but more extreme options are also available, writes Wolfgang Münchau.

9. Nick Clegg's time to speak up (Guardian)

The Lib Dem leader's challenge in the runup to the coming elections is differentiating the party clearly from his Tory partners, says Chris Huhne. 

10. Trust the people to decide on Europe? Whatever next! (Daily Telegraph)

The public are perfectly capable of casting an informed vote – but Labour won’t let them, says Boris Johnson. 

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.