Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It's a myth the generations are at war. We're all in this together (Guardian)

Instead of starting a proxy war pitting old voters against young, politicians should be creating whole-family policies, writes Jackie Ashley. 

2. Bridging the poverty gap calls for bold ideas (Daily Telegraph)

Raising the minimum wage will help the poor, but it is no substitute for free-market reform, argues Jeremy Warner.

3. Only trust can dampen this inflamed anger (Times)

Recruiting more black officers is the best way to bring calm to the combustible streets of Tottenham, writes Philip Collins. 

4. Tomorrow holds both risk and riches (Financial Times)

Pressures for conflict in a more disordered planet are there for all to see, writes Philip Stephens. 

5. Gangsterism, not racism, was the root of Duggan’s shooting (Daily Telegraph)

Too many children on council estates are being drawn into a life of crime because work does not pay, says Fraser Nelson. 

6. Winter Olympics: one day the worm will turn against these gods of sport (Guardian)

After Vladimir Putin, how many more leaders will risk their nation's security and economy for an IOC mega-event, asks Simon Jenkins.

7. The strange case of the 'influential’ board (Daily Telegraph)

It was remarkable that Nadhim Zahawi decided to attack the National Planning Policy Framework, says Isabel Hardman. 

8. Free politics from intellectual vacuum (Financial Times)

Conservatives and progressives have to learn from each other, writes Michael Ignatieff.

9. There's no sense in querying the Mark Duggan jury (Independent)

To accuse them of being illogical or stupid is to reject what a jury is for, says Mary Dejevsky.

10. The stench of a cover-up over Libya grows (Times)

The refusal to release a report into the killing of Yvonne Fletcher may be due to official embarrassment, says Ben Macintyre.

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The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

Plus: Rant or Rave? Find out which podcasts have had our hosts on tenterhooks.

Listen to this episode of The Deep Dive now:

 

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