Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The next election may be a year away, but Osborne is on the campaign trail. It’s a risky strategy (Independent)

A party’s pre-election "tax and spend" plans can withstand scrutiny for six months but not for a year and a half, says Steve Richards.

2. Minimum wage rise could be a Tory winner (Times)

Cameron needs a surprise move to rebuild his party’s image, writes Rachel Sylvester. It may come with a boost for the low paid.

3. Young should blame bad luck not policy (Financial Times)

The baby boomers enjoyed almost miraculously benign circumstances that will not be repeated, writes Janan Ganesh.

4. George Osborne's cuts are a squeeze too far (Guardian)

Cuts on the scale the chancellor is suggesting would be extreme – and they are not necessary, says IFS head Paul Johnson.

5. A Smaller State (Times)

The government is right to seek more cuts — but it is unfair to load the burden on to the young, says a Times editorial.

6. There's a new climate of diktat and fear sweeping through the NHS (Guardian)

An occupational therapist who won awards for her work has been sacked for querying cuts to a stroke unit, writes Polly Toynbee.

7. Cameron’s plan for 2014 is to prove he’s a man of his word (Daily Telegraph)

This year will be the Tory leadership’s chance to show that its promises are worth having, writes Benedict Brogan.

8. Take inspiration from Sarajevo, not Munich (Financial Times)

Pointless aggression belongs in the playground, not in international affairs, says Gideon Rachman.

9. Pragmatic public wants immigration mended, not ended (Independent)

People may prefer to see immigration at lower levels – but they don’t want to turn away the positive contribution from migrants, says Sunder Katwala.

10. Betting-shop machines sucking cash out of communities … this is what predatory capitalism looks like (Guardian)

While giving councils greater powers to block new gambling shops, it would be better to cut the maximum stake on fixed-odds betting terminals, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

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We're hiring! Join the New Statesman as an editorial assistant

The NS is looking for a new recruit.

The New Statesman is hiring an editorial assistant, who will work across the website and magazine to help the office run smoothly. The ideal candidate will have excellent language skills, a passion for journalism, and the ability to work quickly and confidently under pressure.

The job is a broad one – you will need to understand the requirements of both halves of the magazine (politics and culture) as well as having an interest in the technical requirements of magazine and website production. Experience with podcasts and social media would be helpful.

The right person will have omnivorous reading habits and the ability to assimilate new topics at speed. You will be expected to help out with administration tasks around the office, so you must be willing to take direction and get involved with unglamorous tasks. There will be opportunities to write, but this will not form the main part of the job. (Our current editorial assistant is now moving on to a writing post.)

This is a full-time paid job, which would suit a recent graduate or someone who is looking for an entry into journalism. On the job training and help with career development will be offered.

Please apply with an email to Stephen Bush (Stephen. Bush @ with the subject line ‘Editorial Assistant application’.  

In your covering letter, please include a 300-word analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the New Statesman. Please also include 500 words on what you consider to be the most interesting trend in British politics, and your CV as a Word document. 

The deadline for applications is noon on Monday 12th October.