Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Austerity Labour is on its way and Ed Balls is leading the charge (Daily Telegraph)

The shadow chancellor must save money – and the NHS – if his party is to win the general election in 2015, writes Mary Riddell. 

2. The challenges of a post-crisis world (Financial Times)

Nations must nurture recovery and promote reform, writes Martin Wolf. Co-operation and communication should be the order of the day.

3. One tax rise too far and suddenly . . . crash! (Times)

Labour thinks it can increase tax on wealth creators without consequence, writes Daniel Finkelstein. Eventually it will reach a tipping point.

4. RBS is the people's bank. So let's stop this annual festival of bribery (Guardian)

Bonus culture has become so warped that bankers presiding over losses of £8bn still think they deserve a reward, writes Simon Jenkins. 

5. After a decade of pre-eminence, the balance of the world economy is tilting away from the BRICS (Independent)

While these countries were growing so fast we tended to ignore the warning signs, writes Hamish McRae. 

6. Our workplaces are about as family-friendly as a 19th-century mill (Guardian)

Maternity leave, sick pay, the minimum wage – the ability to claim these vital rights has been torched by our zero-hours economy, writes Zoe Williams. 

7. Will Obama stand with Japan against China? (Times)

Washington’s weakness – from Kiev to Damascus – has encouraged Beijing to assert itself, says Roger Boyes.

8. Imagine the explosion of growth if we got serious about tax-cutting (Daily Telegraph)

Those on the lowest incomes should pay no tax at at all; while the hard-pressed middle class should face a flat tax, says Allister Heath. 

9. Politicians must lead on immigration (Financial Times)

If we want the world’s best ideas we need innovators living among us, writes Gus O’Donnell.

10. Why I'm speaking up for Islam against the loudmouths who have hijacked it (Guardian)

I tweeted a cartoon of Jesus and Mo, writes Maajid Nawaz. My aim was to carve out a space where Muslims can be heard without fearing the blasphemy charge.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.