Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Forget the furore over the 50p tax rate. The Tories will regret it if they underestimate the Balls/Miliband team (Independent)

They’ve fought four elections navigating the hazardous politics of “tax and spend”, notes Steve Richards. 

2. Labour is confirming critics’ suspicions (Financial Times)

The party’s 50p tax plan may poll well but when employers call it a job-killer, voters will listen, says Janan Ganesh. 

3. Ed Balls's 50p tax rate won't harm business – but these kleptocrats will (Guardian)

The only thing a higher taxation rate will stifle is growing inequality, says Polly Toynbee. No wonder the captains of industry are yowling.

4. Dave and Ed need their lipstick and high heels (Times)

Politicians should swing both ways, writes Rachel Sylvester. Conventional old-left or old-right policies won’t attract the votes both parties need.

5. Voters may be seething, but they don’t want to be taken for idiots (Daily Telegraph)

The idea of soaking the rich may be popular in the pub, but the Prime Minister is counting on voters to put aside their anger and understand the deeper questions at stake, writes Benedict Brogan. 

6. Globalisation and growth are no cure-all (Financial Times)

New forms of political conflict have emerged that are resistant to traditional prescriptions, writes Gideon Rachman. 

7. Think there's a cap on elderly care costs? Think again. You're in for a shock (Guardian)

The charge for our elderly relatives could be several times higher than the £72,000 we've been told, says Jackie Ashley.

8. NewKIP (Times)

Nigel Farage has grand ambitions to replace the Conservatives with UKIP, says a Times editorial. This could deliver a Labour government.

9. Why are we failing our cleverest children? (Daily Telegraph)

Britain should take lessons from around the world in how to teach its brightest pupils, argues Martin Stephen. 

10. Never again? The loss of trust in the European project holds great dangers (Guardian)

We must heed the lessons of 1914, says Frank-Walter Steinmeier. Those who rail against the EU should appreciate that it has brought us peace.

GETTY
Show Hide image

The NS Podcast #222: Queen's Speech Special

The New Statesman podcast.

Helen and Stephen discuss what was left out, watered down and generally squished around in the Queen's Speech - from prison reform to fox hunting - and what kind of stage it sets for the coming parliamentary term. Will Labour's stance on immigration have to change? And what Brexit deal could secure a parliamentary majority? Clue: it's a royal mess.

Quotes of the episode:

Helen on domestic violence: "The big lesson of the last couple of weeks is that the involvement of domestic violence in Terror has finally made (slightly more men) take it slightly more seriously. As actually now it becomes part of an anti-radicalisation process."

Stephen on Conservative strategy: "If you look at the back end of the Conservative government in the 90s: when your parliamentary situation is rocky, the best way of dealing with that is just for parliamentary not to sit all that much. Don't bring the pain."

Helen on Brexit: "There is an interesting complacency about the dominance and attractiveness of the British economy [...] whereas actually our economy has recovered quite badly and our productivity is still quite low. I wouldn't be that smug about the British economy."

You can subscribe to the podcast through iTunes here or with this RSS feed: http://rss.acast.com/newstatesman, or listen using the player below.

Want to give us feedback on our podcast, or have an idea for something we should cover?

Visit newstatesman.com/podcast for more details and how to contact us.

 

 

0800 7318496