Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. 'Agenda for Hope': We want a fairer society – and here’s how we can achieve it (Independent)

Social and economic inequality blights Britain, writes Owen Jones. Here's my nine-point manifesto for change.

2. Bash the rich and you deprive us of what their taxes pay for (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Balls’s insistence on restoring the 50p rate shows his ignorance of how the economy works, says Boris Johnson.

3. 50p tax rate: more than small change (Guardian)

For the first time in a quarter of a century, Labour's manifesto will not be able to contain a line saying "no rise in income tax rates", notes a Guardian editorial. 

4. Ukraine’s spiral to disaster has echoes of Syria (Times)

As Moscow and Kiev suspect, Europe is too divided to defend its interests to the east, writes Edward Lucas.

5. The truth about David Cameron's fracking fairytale (Guardian)

Cameron's story about how shale gas will save the British economy is demonstrably and devastatingly false, says Chris Huhne. 

6. Automation and the threat to jobs (Financial Times)

The policy implications for societies need to be addressed, says an FT editorial. 

7. Until Balls says he was wrong, he’s a liability (Times)

Ed Miliband won’t sack him – but Labour needs to find another way to show the voters it is economically credible, says Gaby Hinsliff. 

8. A fairer nation instead of lions led by donkeys (Daily Mirror)

National discussions will remain skewed against those who need most a political voice in Westminster if they don’t go to the ballot box, writes Kevin Maguire.

9. If Darrin Manning were a high school dropout, he'd still have the right to walk the streets unmolested (Guardian)

An obsession with deserving victims means the horror of the injustice is calibrated against the honour of the individual, writes Gary Younge. 

10. High stakes merger for Hillary Clinton and Obama (Financial Times)

The former Democratic rivals will now sink or swim together, writes Edward Luce.

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Ed Miliband is interviewing David Miliband on the Jeremy Vine show

Sibling rivalry hits the radio.

David was the chosen one, the protege, the man destined to lead the Labour party. 

But instead his awkward younger brother committed the ultimate sibling betrayal by winning the Labour party leadership election instead.

Not only that, but he lost the 2015 general election, and between those two dates, tinkered with the leadership election rules in a way that ultimately led to Jeremy Corbyn's victory

It seems, though, radio can bring these two men of thwarted ambition together.

Your Mole can reveal that Ed Miliband will interview his brother on the Jeremy Vine show, at 1pm during the two-hour show, which starts at 12.

But David, who is president of the International Rescue Committee, is there to discuss something more serious than family drama - his recent TED talk about the refugee crisis.  

Although the Mole understands that although the Miliband brothers will reunite on air, they will still be separated by the body of water that is the Atlantic Ocean...

I'm a mole, innit.

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