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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain and France are in the same boat (Financial Times)

Cross-Channel rivalry cannot hide the reality that any ideas about superiority are misplaced, writes Philip Stephens.

2. It’s true: we’re better off than a year ago (Times)

Among those in work, all but the richest are now benefiting from the recovery and tax cuts, claims Matthew Hancock.

3. Steve Webb's pensions U-turn is a dead duck on the dust heap of disasters (Guardian)

The government's bold assault on the industry has failed to materialise, and the grand theft mis-selling continues, says Polly Toynbee.

4. Left and right are both wrong about Iain Duncan Smith (Times)

The man is unfairly demonised by some and distrusted by others, writes Steve Richards. 

5. Once more, Ukraine’s dreams of freedom are crushed by Moscow (Daily Telegraph)

History is repeating itself in Kiev, and the west can take no pride in its role, says Con Coughlin. 

6. Social reform is a moral mission that will define the Tories’ future (Daily Telegraph)

Peter Lilley’s "little list" has hung over the party for too long – and IDS can heal the wounds, says Fraser Nelson. 

7. Brighton's council tax revolution could strike a blow for democracy (Guardian)

Someone must stand up to the bullying of Eric Pickles and the "localism" act, writes Simon Jenkins. Can Brighton's Green party lead the way?

8. Ed’s 100-year-old recipe won’t work today (Times)

The Labour leader’s ambitions to reform capitalism will not suit the regulated, global nature of today’s UK economy, writes Philip Collins. 

9. The plight of Syria's refugees transcends party politics. What’s worrying is that Nigel Farage realised that before our PM (Independent)

Mr Cameron, unlike Ukip's leader, is a prisoner of strict party discipline, writes Andreas Whittam Smith. 

10. Look beyond Davos to indebted Detroit (Financial Times)

If investors want to forecast asset prices in the west, they should look past official numbers, writes Gillian Tett.

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