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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What exactly can private schools teach the state sector? (Guardian)

As the head of an independent school puts forward plans to tackle inequality, he forgets his sector's dire record when working in state education, says John Harris.

2. The rise of a new US federalism (Financial Times)

With federal government largely paralysed, the future is being shaped in the cities, writes Edward Luce.

3. What is it about male politicians that they seem to have such problems dealing with women? (Independent)

In France, female MPs endure obscene gestures, wolf whistles and other insults, writes Yasmin Alibhai Brown. 

4. Our housing is in crisis – we need both brownfield and greenfield sites (Guardian)

The tougher the planning controls, the higher the house prices, writes Chris Huhne. We must ease restrictions in our cities and in the countryside.

5. Cleggton Keynes in England’s rolling hills? No thanks, Nick (Daily Telegraph)

We don’t need any new 'garden’ cities, writes Boris Johnson. London’s brownfield sites can solve the housing crisis.

6. Obama’s plan for US surveillance (Financial Times)

The proposals offer only a modest advance on what is needed, says an FT editorial. 

7. After Owen Jones’s open letter to Ukip voters last week, here is my reply (Independent)

I fear that you may have been reading too much into a statistical sample and haven’t taken the time to get out and meet our voters, writes Nigel Farage to Owen Jones.

8. Growing Pains (Times)

As the global economy slowly recovers, policymakers should recall that debt-fuelled consumption has limits, says a Times editorial.

9. I believe this ghastly woman hastened my friend's death (Daily Mail)

Lord McAlpine was broken down by the cruel strain of being a victim of Sally Bercow's terrible lie, writes Simon Heffer. 

10. If we don’t care, we will legalise euthanasia (Times)

Dutch right-to-die laws opened the door to the killing of mentally ill patients, writes Peter Franklin.