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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband's pitch is radical – but his party is stuck in 1997 (Guardian)

With growth returning, only a frontal assault can turn people against the inept nastiness of George Osborne's economics, says Polly Toynbee.

2. It may take the EU to save this country from Ed Miliband’s economic agenda (Daily Telegraph)

There are benefits to Brussels – not least that it could block Labour's more dangerous ideas, says Fraser Nelson. 

3. Banking will be swept aside by the internet (Times)

Miliband is right that the industry must change, says Paul Marshall. But his solutions are way behind the times.

4. The Bank of England must go slow on tightening (Financial Times)

The MPC must consider the risks of stifling a still fragile recovery by raising rates prematurely, says Martin Wolf. 

5. It's no good just whipping the bankers (Daily Telegraph)

Economic growth and reform should be the priority, rather than yet more regulation, says Jeremy Warner.

6. If the MoD can't name the enemy, it shouldn't buy the weapons (Guardian)

Britain hasn't faced a true threat since cold war, but that hasn't stopped the defence lobby from peddling paranoia, writes Simon Jenkins.

7. A leader too weak to stop Lord Rennard damaging his party (Daily Telegraph)

The peer refuses to apologise to his alleged sexual harassment victims and there's nothing the party can do to force him, writes Isabel Hardman. 

8. The Bank of England must go slow on tightening (Financial Times)

The MPC must consider the risks of stifling a still fragile recovery by raising rates prematurely, says Martin Wolf. 

9. We should keep our noses out. This is private (Times)

Our interest in the Hollande affair is mere prurience, writes Philip Collins. We don’t need new laws, just a new attitude.

10. Until Aung San Suu Kyi can run for President, Burma is no democracy (Independent)

If the military blocks constitutional change, the world will want to know why, writes John Bercow.