Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On one thing about the NHS, Jeremy Hunt is right (Guardian)

The health secretary isn't meddling, says Steve Richards. He must be accountable to the taxpayers who fund the NHS.

2. It is high time we raised interest rates and returned to normality (Daily Telegraph)

Persisting with this monetary stimulus will delay recovery and sow seeds of future crises, argues Jeremy Warner.

3. Little England should prepare a big welcome (Times)

We need immigrants and most see themselves as British, writes Philip Collins. So what happens if Britain gets broken up?

4. If you want to curb immigration, pay workers a living wage (Guardian)

Cheapskate employers are importing what too often looks like serf-labour instead of hiring ethically at home, says Polly Toynbee.

5. Call out the troops to deal with McCluskey and Co? Not any more (Independent)

We now know that through the summer of 1984, the government was not as confident as it pretended to be that the strike would fail, writes Andy McSmith. 

6. Europe must rebuild faith in democracy (Financial Times)

Voters are frustrated that they exert less influence than ever over elites, writes Tony Barber.

7. Richard Haass’s talks will not have failed if Britain accepts it must now get real on Northern Ireland (Independent)

The Good Friday Agreement was not a prelude to greater integration, writes Mary Dejevsky.

8. The young people failed by society's tyranny of the norm (Guardian)

In schools and wider society we still fear, mock and segregate young people who, like my brother, have learning disabilities, says Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett. 

9. A year in a word: Abenomics (Financial Times)

The premise of Shinzo Abe’s economic plan is that 15 years of deflation have sapped Japan’s 'animal spirits', writes David Pilling. 

10. Furious rail commuters are switching their targets (Times)

Anger is moving from companies to politicians, says Gaby Hinsliff. 

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.