Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How Ed Miliband can harness the right's tactics to bring in a wave of left-wing populism in 2014 (Independent)

Simple messages must be repeated ad infinitum, hammered into the electorate’s skulls, says Owen Jones. 

2. What viral content does to news (Financial Times)

The fastest-growing forms of online ‘content’ are click-bait headlines and videos, writes John Gapper.

3. The prospect of the 2015 general election will reveal our parties' true colours (Guardian)

Labour's challenge is to build a spirit of optimism, while the Lib Dems will need to recast their collusion as restraint, says Zoe Williams. 

4. Miliband is a far worse leader than Kinnock (Times)

In 1992 Labour failed the voters’ trust test, writes Tim Montgomerie. Now it refuses to face the truth about its economic errors.

5. Scapegoating migrants for Britain's crisis will damage us all (Guardian)

The Tories and Ukip are vying to terrify the public about Romanians and Bulgarians, writes Seumas Milne. What's needed is protection at work and a crash housing programme.

6. Europe is slowly strangling the life out of national democracy (Daily Telegraph)

Decisions affecting the lives of voters are being taken by bureaucrats and unelected 'experts', says Peter Oborne. 

7. You’re wrong. But do you want to be told? (Times)

The wide gap between perception and reality is a challenge for those unwilling to pander to populism, says David Aaronovitch.  

8. It is Unionist cowardice that is largely to blame for the failure to reach an agreement in Northern Ireland (Independent)

If Unionists imagine that a show of obstinacy now will gain them a better deal on flags and parades in the long run, they are mistaken, says an Independent editorial. 

9. FTSE 100 at 30: A big hand for the Footsie (Daily Telegraph)

The launch of the FTSE 100 index 30 years ago signalled a new era for investors – creating great wealth as well as causing mayhem, writes Martin Vander Weyer. 

10. Abe could say sorry by shunning Yasukuni (Financial Times)

The sincerity of several leaders’ remorse for Japan’s past aggression is questioned, writes David Pilling. 

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Tim Farron sacks former MP David Ward

The Liberal Democrat leader said Ward's remarks made him "unfit" to stand. 

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron has sacked David Ward as a candidate declaring him "unfit to represent the party". 

Ward, who lost his seat in Bradford East in 2015, once said "the Jews" were "within a few years of liberation from the death camps...inflicting atrocities on Palestinians". At the time, the comments caused outcry, and Ward faced disciplinary procedures - later adjourned.

Farron, though, doesn't intend to revisit this particular episode. After news broke that Ward had been re-selected to stand as a candidate, he initially said it was not the leader's job to select candidates, but hours later had intervened to stop it. 

In a short statement, he said: "I believe in a politics that is open, tolerant and united. David Ward is unfit to represent the party and I have sacked him."

Although Ward has been involved in anti-racism organisations, he has courted controversy with his conflation of Jews with Israel, his questioning of Israel's right to exist, and his tweet in the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo attack, in which French Jews were targeted, that "Je suis #Palestinian".

While the anti-Semitism row threatened to knock the Lib Dem's early election campaign off course, Farron's decision may help him avoid the ongoing saga haunting the rival Labour party. In April, Labour decided not to expel Ken Livingstone for his claim that Adolf Hitler supported Zionism "before he went mad and ended up killing six million Jews".

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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