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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Under the iPads and PS4s the ghoul of debt is lurking (Guardian)

Wages are low, debt is rising, and our economy is as vulnerable as it was five years ago, writes John Harris. Yet the Christmas binge is back.

2. Take if from me: wages are not going to rise much over the coming years (Independent)

The Office for Budget Responsibility’s forecasts are way too optimistic, says David Blanchflower. 

3. Obama cannot lead from behind on trade (Financial Times)

Continuing to tiptoe around the issue is unlikely to serve the president for much longer, says Edward Luce.

4. In Scotland, the unionists need to win hearts, not minds (Guardian)

An economic argument won't decide the independence referendum, says Chris Huhne. What matters is whether Scots feel British.

5. I was planning on a dash for the aspirin – and then you rang in (Daily Telegraph)

Rich rainmakers and hedgies need to copy the generosity shown by the Telegraph’s readers, says Boris Johnson. 

6. MPs' pay: Westminster unreality cheque (Guardian)

The gap between what MPs say about their own pay in private and what they feel constrained to say in public is immense, notes a Guardian editorial. 

7. Reasons not to fear superchildren (Financial Times)

Pisa represents only one measure of performance in schools, writes Sam Freedman.

8. Osborne’s festive bells simply don’t ring true (Times)

What recovery? Britain is weighed down by old people and lack of productivity, writes Emma Duncan. 

9. An obsessive’s documenting of Israeli war crimes in Lebanon can show us how the west lost respect for international law (Independent)

One Norwegian officer left Lebanon with a typed report on torture taped to his chest, writes Robert Fisk. 

10. A gender gap that simply doesn’t add up (Daily Telegraph)

The shocking divide between boys and girls in maths and science is damaging Britain, says Elizabeth Truss.