Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Follow Mandela's example, and laugh at this rightwing fawning (Guardian)

Mandela not only made history, he did so in a way that made others, from David Cameron to Elton John, want to rewrite theirs, writes Marina Hyde.

2. South Africa may still face a day of reckoning (Times) (£)

Even Nelson Mandela’s transcendent goodness might not be enough to secure a lasting settlement, writes Matthew Parris.

3. The Left does not own Nelson Mandela’s legacy (Telegraph)

With the death of Nelson Mandela, the British Left has lost its leading icon, says Mary Riddell.

4. Africans must now walk to freedom (Financial Times) (£)

A man of unique authority, Mandela set a very high standard for us to attain, says Kofi Annan.

5. How computer games can help us overthrow capitalism (Guardian)

The challenge is to design a game where instead of being a badass in LA, you can be a goodass on a communal farm, says Paul Mason.

6. Ed Miliband needs to look forward and avoid George Osborne’s expertly laid trap (Independent)

Osborne’s Autumn Statement performance was that of a man confident that he has won the argument, says Andrew Grice.

7. What does George Osborne's growth offer the young? (Guardian)

The forecasts of growth should be good news for young people just starting out in work, but in fact this appears to be a recovery for the elderly, the wealthy and the bosses, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

8. Balls isn’t working. Labour must ditch this liability (Times) (£)

Whatever the opposite of star quality is, the floundering Shadow Chancellor has it in spades, says Jenni Russell.

9. Of Bitcoins, bubbles and B&Q vouchers (Financial Times) (£)

The object of anarcho-utopian fantasies is of little value if you want a pizza, writes Tim Harford.

10. This court case will make Nigella stronger (Times) (£)

The more the revelations emerge about her troubled marriage, the more we love her for her flaws , says Janice Turner.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.