Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It's not racist to be anxious over large-scale immigration (Guardian)

In between the rightwing hysteria over the 1 January changes and liberal pleas for tolerance, is a public preoccupied with rent, not race, writes John Harris.

2. How to prolong a banking credit crunch (Financial Times)

The lousy agreement on banking union will produce the financial sector equivalent of austerity, says Wolfgang Münchau.

3. Cameron’s given up on Turkey because his goose is cooked (Times)

The PM’s move to block anyone else from joining the EU is a desperate political move, says John McTernan.

4. At last, everyone gets it on public spending (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's conversion to prudence signals an overdue change in the political centre of gravity, argues Andrew Haldenby.

5. Someone needs to fight the selfish, short-sighted old (Guardian)

The cost of pandering to pensioners means we are penalising our young in relation to education, healthcare and housing, says Chris Huhne.

6. Ed Miliband should get the carving knife - this turkey government is done (Daily Mirror)

The Labour leader should trust his values and ignore siren voices urging him to lurch rightwards, says Kevin Maguire.

7. This isn't 'feminism'. It's Islamophobia (Guardian)

I am infuriated by white men stirring up anti-Muslim prejudice to derail debate on western sexism, writes Laurie Penny.

8. University challenge: Despite higher fees, there are more students than ever (Independent)

The time has come for angry Liberal Democrats to move on, says an Independent editorial.

9. America must dump its disrupters in 2014 (Financial Times)

This has been a very disruptive year but nothing about it was creative or constructive, writes Edward Luce.

10. Add the EU to the list of myths we’re brainwashed to believe (Daily Telegraph)

Like corks, and turning off mobiles on planes, 'Europe' may one day turn out to be pointless, says Boris Johnson.

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This is no time for a coup against a successful Labour leader

Don't blame Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour Party's crisis.

"The people who are sovereign in our party are the members," said John McDonnell this morning. As the coup against Jeremy Corbyn gains pace, the Shadow Chancellor has been talking a lot of sense. "It is time for people to come together to work in the interest of the country," he told Peston on Sunday, while emphasising that people will quickly lose trust in politics altogether if this internal squabbling continues. 

The Tory party is in complete disarray. Just days ago, the first Tory leader in 23 years to win a majority for his party was forced to resign from Government after just over a year in charge. We have some form of caretaker Government. Those who led the Brexit campaign now have no idea what to do. 

It is disappointing that a handful of Labour parliamentarians have decided to join in with the disintegration of British politics.

The Labour Party had the opportunity to keep its head while all about it lost theirs. It could have positioned itself as a credible alternative to a broken Government and a Tory party in chaos. Instead we have been left with a pathetic attempt to overturn the democratic will of the membership. 

But this has been coming for some time. In my opinion it has very little to do with the ramifications of the referendum result. Jeremy Corbyn was asked to do two things throughout the campaign: first, get Labour voters to side with Remain, and second, get young people to do the same.

Nearly seven in ten Labour supporters backed Remain. Young voters supported Remain by a 4:1 margin. This is about much more than an allegedly half-hearted referendum performance.

The Parliamentary Labour Party has failed to come to terms with Jeremy Corbyn’s emphatic victory. In September of last year he was elected with 59.5 per cent of the vote, some 170,000 ahead of his closest rival. It is a fact worth repeating. If another Labour leadership election were to be called I would expect Jeremy Corbyn to win by a similar margin.

In the recent local elections Jeremy managed to increase Labour’s share of the national vote on the 2015 general election. They said he would lose every by-election. He has won them emphatically. Time and time again Jeremy has exceeded expectation while also having to deal with an embittered wing within his own party.

This is no time for a leadership coup. I am dumbfounded by the attempt to remove Jeremy. The only thing that will come out of this attempted coup is another leadership election that Jeremy will win. Those opposed to him will then find themselves back at square one. Such moves only hurt Labour’s electoral chances. Labour could be offering an ambitious plan to the country concerning our current relationship with Europe, if opponents of Jeremy Corbyn hadn't decided to drop a nuke on the party.

This is a crisis Jeremy should take no responsibility for. The "bitterites" will try and they will fail. Corbyn may face a crisis of confidence. But it's the handful of rebel Labour MPs that have forced the party into a crisis of existence.

Liam Young is a commentator for the IndependentNew Statesman, Mirror and others.