Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The real lessons of the crisis (Financial Times)

The real work that needs to be done is finding ways to recover lost output and productivity, says Martin Wolf. 

2. How Britain made it through the year of living dangerously (Daily Telegraph)

From crime to jobs to the rise of the far right, the prophets of doom have been confounded, says Fraser Nelson. 

3. Charity is a fine thing, but it can't justify the wealth of the 1% (Guardian)

The rich pretend the option is the status quo or outright communism, writes Polly Toynbee. But giving is no excuse for gross inequality.

4. Obama's NSA review gives the lie to Britain's timid platitudes: a debate is possible (Guardian)

In the US, the official response to Snowden's revelations celebrates journalism and calls for real change, writes Alan Rusbridger. In Britain, the picture has been rather different.

5. A good year for Putin but bad for Russia (Financial Times)

Pardoning Khodorkovsky was the act of someone who pretends his nation is still the equal of the US, writes Philip Stephens.

6. A History Boys education is not for everyone (Times)

The real problem for our schools is helping the majority who are left untouched by academic selection, says Philip Collins. 

7. The Lib Dems send in a big beast, but don’t expect carnage (Daily Telegraph)

Even staying distinctively Lib Dem is no guarantee that a junior minister can make an enormous impression, writes Isabel Hardman. 

8. Lee Rigby murder: What do we mean by ‘radicalisation’? (Independent)

After the conviction of Rigby's killers, it’s a term we need to apply carefully, writes Mary Dejevsky. 

9. A History Boys education is not for everyone (Times)

The real problem for our schools is helping the majority who are left untouched by academic selection, says Philip Collins. 

10. The EU is in denial over its failed currency (Daily Telegraph)

While Britain and the US kickstart their economic recovery, Europe clings to its sinking ship, says Jeremy Warner. 

Photo: Getty Images/Christopher Furlong
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A dozen defeated parliamentary candidates back Caroline Flint for deputy

Supporters of all the leadership candidates have rallied around Caroline Flint's bid to be deputy leader.

Twelve former parliamentary candidates have backed Caroline Flint's bid to become deputy leader in an open letter to the New Statesman. Dubbing the Don Valley MP a "fantastic campaigner", they explain that why despite backing different candidates for the leadership, they "are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader", who they describe as a "brilliant communicator and creative policy maker". 

Flint welcomed the endorsement, saying: "our candidates know better than most what it takes to win the sort of seats Labour must gain in order to win a general election, so I'm delighted to have their support.". She urged Labour to rebuild "not by lookin to the past, but by learning from the past", saying that "we must rediscover Labour's voice, especially in communities wher we do not have a Labour MP:".

The Flint campaign will hope that the endorsement provides a boost as the campaign enters its final days.

The full letter is below:

There is no route to Downing Street that does not run through the seats we fought for Labour at the General Election.

"We need a new leadership team that can win back Labour's lost voters.

Although we are backing different candidates to be Leader, we are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader.

Not only is Caroline a fantastic campaigner, who toured the country supporting Labour's candidates, she's also a brilliant communicator and creative policy maker, which is exactly what we need in our next deputy leader.

If Labour is to win the next election, it is vital that we pick a leadership team that doesn't just appeal to Labour Party members, but is capable of winning the General Election. Caroline Flint is our best hope of beating the Tories.

We urge Labour Party members and supporters to unite behind Caroline Flint and begin the process of rebuilding to win in 2020.

Jessica Asato (Norwich North), Will Straw (Rossendale and Darween), Nick Bent (Warrington South), Mike Le Surf (South Basildon and East Thurrock), Tris Osborne (Chatham and Aylesford), Victoria Groulef (Reading West), Jamie Hanley (Pudsey), Kevin McKeever (Northampton South), Joy Squires (Worcester), Paul Clark (Gillingham and Rainham), Patrick Hall (Bedford) and Mary Wimbury (Aberconwy)

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.