Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Grammar schools do not aid social mobility. Stop this deluded thinking (Guardian)

The figures show clearly that selective schools entrench inequality rather than help the poor, writes John Harris. They should all be scrapped.

2. Iran will test Obama’s game plan (Financial Times)

Talks could show how easily he is outplayed by tougher opponents, including the US Congress, writes Edward Luce.

3. Western armies know they are not answerable to any overseer – they do as they please (Independent)

The murder carried out by Marine A is not just shocking in itself, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown. It speaks of a wider western attitude in all its arrogance and brutality.

4. Marine A must face justice, but the law has its limits in warfare (Daily Telegraph)

Unlike other countries, Britain is allowing its soldiers to be hobbled by the 'right to life’, says Boris Johnson.

5. The Tories' psychosis over Europe is leading them to disaster (Guardian)

David Cameron failed to face down his party's nationalist demons while in opposition, says Chris Huhne. Now he's paying the price.

6. Right treatment for the Obamacare bug (Financial Times)

There is still time to follow the basic rules of project management, says Lawrence Summers.

7. Right-wing politicians plant hate not hope in our hearts (Daily Mirror)

It suits a disreputable group of scaremongering right-wing politicians that migrants are wrongly blamed for our problems, writes Kevin Maguire. 

8. The Prime Minister is presiding over an A&E brain drain (Times)

New figures show today that half of all vacancies in casualty departments go unfilled, writes Andy Burnham.

9. Only the Tories offer opportunities for all (Daily Telegraph)

The Tories must remind voters that they are, and always have been, the party of aspiration, says a Telegraph editorial. 

10. Does China need democracy to be rich? (Times)

Westerners are subject to more economic meddling from the State than our Communist-led cousins are, writes Matt Ridley.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.