Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. How hateful is Britain? Insulted, bullied and murdered – for being disabled (Independent)

In our supposedly civilised society, people who are ‘different’ still face abuse, vigilante justice and death, writes Ian Birrell.

2. The last prejudice? Don’t be fat in fashion or politics (Times) (£)

Women have broken through many ceilings and barriers but they’re still not allowed to be size-16s , writes Janice Turner.

3. Parliament needs to rein in the sinister growth of the payroll government (Telegraph)

The time has come for a proper inquiry into one of Westminster’s biggest open secrets - the growth of prime ministerial power through the payroll vote, says Paul Goodman.

4. Jeremy Paxman is as much 'stuck in' politics as you or I, Nick Clegg (Guardian)

To cast the Newsnight presenter as a parasite reveals Clegg's alarming delusion that politics is only done by politicians, says Marina Hyde.

5. Dig deep, sow seeds and watch Britain grow (Times) (£)

The UK needs HS3 as well as HS2. We need two new cities and more technical colleges. We need long-term vision, says Matthew Parris.

6. John Cole: on paper and on TV, a man of integrity (Guardian)

His integrity was never in doubt, visible in newspaper offices as it would later become to millions of BBC television viewers, says Michael White.

7. Swallow your contempt – Wonga is the symptom, not the problem (Financial Times)(£)

Disdain is no guide to regulating a socially useful sector, writes Tim Harford.

8. Politicians, learn this: people cannot live by bread alone (Guardian)

Russell Brand, Grayson Perry and co are our new priests, plugging a gap the church no longer fills and that our leaders fear to address, writes Jonathan Freedland.

9. Clean up the police, Theresa - or forget about No.10 (Daily Mail)

May has a massive obstacle to overcome if she is to lead: the catastrophic crisis of confidence in the police, for whom she is ultimately responsible, says Simon Heffer.

10. Prince Charles at 65: A modern man of undimmed energy ready to be king (Telegraph)

As the Prince of Wales approaches his 65th birthday, he has made a success of his current, unique role, and that bodes well for his next, argues Charles Moore.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.