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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don’t summon up the immigration monster (Times)

Most people’s assumptions about immigrants are wrong, but politicians cynically play to their prejudices, says David Aaronovitch. 

2. Labour must answer the SNP with more than a slogan (Guardian)

Unless Ed Miliband defines what One Nation means, the nationalists could win a victory that will leave him paralysed, says Martin Kettle.

3. Iran nuclear deal: The friends of Israel who are refusing to face facts (Daily Telegraph)

Benjamin Netanyahu’s acolytes are hell-bent on undermining Barack Obama's nuclear pact with Iran, writes Peter Oborne.

4. It’s a rip-off. We need an English parliament (Times)

The formula requiring Westminster to pay for huge benefits north of the Border must be abandoned, says Tim Montgomerie.

Historians of the future may say the Lib Dem did as well as he could have – nonsense, says Owen Jones.

6. Scotland: A Yes vote offers some wonderful 'what ifs’ (Daily Telegraph)

If the Scots opt for independence, the negotiations will be endlessly complex, says Sue Cameron.

7. Austerity is wreaking havoc, but the left can unite to build a better Europe (Guardian)

Zealots for neoliberalism have created a humanitarian tragedy across the continent, says Alexis Tsipras. It is our destiny to fight back.

8. In the Royal Mail sell-off scandal, taxpayers have been robbed by the very piranhas who caused the crash (Daily Mail)

Seldom in financial history has a share offer been so scandalously misjudged, writes Alex Brummer. 

9. America isn't leaving the Middle East, unfortunately (Guardian)

The Iran nuclear deal is a product of the failure of the war on terror, writes Seumas Milne. It should at least hand more control to the region's people.

10. China must tread carefully over islands (Financial Times)

Regional powers are more wary of Beijing than of Tokyo, writes David Pilling.