Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The young are doomed – and only the old can save them (FT)

Twentysomethings are being forced to delay adulthood, writes Chris Cook.

2. The Paul Flowers affair confirms it: 2015 will be a dirty election (Guardian)

From the Co-op to Mid Staffs, the Tory smear machine is operating at full throttle – and it won't relent till polling day, says Jonathan Freedland.

3. Slavery wasn’t abolished two centuries ago. It thrives in Britain today (Times) (£)

Human trafficking is the fastest-growing human international crime. We need a Modern Slavery Act, says Lucy Maule.

4. This obsession with Ethics is one of the great curses of our time (Telegraph)

Charles Moore: Paul Flowers and the Co-op Bank thought they were so good they couldn’t possibly be bad.

5. Iran can be made a force for Middle Eastern peace (FT)

Tehran wants to end the sanctions and to be seen as a legitimate Middle Eastern power, writes David Gardner.

6. 180 years after abolition, why is it the slave trade is booming? (Guardian)

We equate slavery with a bygone age. But as the case of three women found in a London house shows, it is far from dead, says Danny Smith.

7. China: now an example to the world on climate change? (Telegraph)

The climate change talks in Warsaw are going nowhere - but in the real world China and the US are both finally taking action to curb coal-fired power stations.

8. Why India Is Going to Mars (International New York Times)

The red planet isn’t just about horoscopes. We can live with superstition, and science, writes Manoj Kumar Patairiya.

9. 'Hutching up' – how London's housing crisis has young people at it like rabbits (Guardian)

Harriet Walker: Unaffordable rents mean couples are choosing to live together too soon, or doomed to stay together to avoid the misery of flatsharing.

10. A universal income is not such a silly idea (FT)

The concept of paying people to sit around has an upside, writes Tim Harford.

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David Cameron calls Sadiq Khan a “proud Muslim” – after trying to link him to Islamic extremism

The PM has his best flipflops on.

After months of backing the nasty racial politics of the Tory mayoral campaign, the Prime Minister has taken the bold move of sharing a platform with infamous moderate Sadiq Khan on the EU Remain campaign trail. Quite a spectacular about-turn.

Compare and contrast, readers.

David Cameron, 20 April 2016

“If we are going to condemn not just violent extremism, but also the extremism that seeks to justify violence in any way, it is very important that we do not back these people, and we do not appear on platforms with them. And I have to say, I am concerned about Labour’s candidate for Mayor of London, who has appeared again and again and again . . . The Honourable Member for Tooting has appeared on a platform with him [imam Suliman Gani] nine times. This man supports IS.”

David Cameron, 30 May 2016

“Let me first of all congratulate Sadiq on his victory. He talked about his father. He’s the son of a bus driver. I’m the son of a stockbroker, which is not quite so romantic. But he makes an important point about our country. In one generation someone who’s a proud Muslim, a proud Brit and a proud Londoner can become mayor of the greatest city on Earth. That says something about our country. There are still glass ceilings we have got to smash. There’s still discrimination we have got to fight.”

What a difference a month makes, eh?

I'm a mole, innit.