Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The cracks are starting to show between the PM and Chancellor (Daily Telegraph)

Far from 'seeing eye to eye’, David Cameron and George Osborne are cut from different political cloth, writes Fraser Nelson. 

2. Independent Scotland’s fiscal hole (Financial Times)

One reason would be the bad initial borrowing position, the other is weaker demographics, says Martin Wolf. 

3. Dear Ed, there still isn’t any money left (Times)

Miliband misunderstands the 2008 crash, says Philip Collins. It didn’t save him, it wrecked his only plan – higher spending.

4. One thing Cameron can't rip from the young is the vote (Guardian)

The lost generation can strike back at a vindictive coalition at election time, says Polly Toynbee. Labour must put their plight centre stage.

5. Trade trumps missiles in power plays (Financial Times)

China is waking up to the fact it is being left behind as the west clings to economic power, writes Philip Stephens. 

6. Politics and the Co-op: a time for mutual respect (Guardian)

The Tories' tactic of playing the man not the ball undermines politics as a whole and blocks the conversation the country needs, says a Guardian editorial. 

7. The rise of Paul Flowers offers a textbook example of cronyism (Independent)

He was sped to his position by indulgences typical in the British elite, writes Mary Dejevsky. 

8. The deficit is still huge. There is no room for tax cuts (Times)

Osborne should resist calls to give us an early Christmas present, says Philip Aldrick.

9. The deficit is still huge. There is no room for tax cuts (Times)

Osborne should resist calls to give us an early Christmas present, says Philip Aldrick.

10. Police crime figures are meaningless. Ban them (Guardian)

Crime statistics could plummet, yet tell us nothing about whether the British are treating each other 'better or worse', writes Simon Jenkins. 

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.