Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Orthodox economists have failed their own market test (Guardian)

Students are demanding alternatives to a free-market dogma with a disastrous record, writes Seumas Milne. That's something we all need.

2. It’s no coincidence the MPs found guilty of fiddling are all Labour (Daily Telegraph)

The party may take the moral high ground, but lying and cheating are deep in its DNA, says Peter Oborne. 

3. Bernard Ingham says Northerners who loathe the Tories are ‘demented’. Perhaps I can put him straight... (Independent)

Slashing the welfare state and cutting taxes on the wealthy was never going to play well, says Owen Jones. 

4. This Pope is no liberal. He’s a true Catholic (Times)

Francis has won the Left’s admiration but this 'pro-lifer' opposes abortion as much as poverty, writes Tim Montgomerie. 

5. Accurate forecasts suit Osborne for once (Financial Times)

Expect a warts-and-all account of the OBR’s inability to see the recovery, says Chris Giles.

6. Has pride in public service had its day? (Daily Telegraph)

Ordinary people are being let down far too often by those who put their own interests first, says Sue Cameron.

7. China will keep its leaders busy (Financial Times)

They have set themselves a formidable task that will have far-reaching consequences, writes David Pilling. 

8. You can’t have an amnesty for murder (Times)

As Northern Ireland becomes increasingly like the rest of Europe it must observe the same legal principles, says David Aaronovitch.

9. The best healthcare delivery system in the world? Are you off your rocker? (Independent)

The Republicans are on a hot streak thanks to Obamacare's false start, writes David Usborne. 

10. JFK's assassination wasn't the end of anything, it just felt that way (Guardian)

Every generation has its Kennedy moments, writes Martin Kettle. From 9/11 to Iraq, history moves on.

Getty
Show Hide image

Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.