Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Orthodox economists have failed their own market test (Guardian)

Students are demanding alternatives to a free-market dogma with a disastrous record, writes Seumas Milne. That's something we all need.

2. It’s no coincidence the MPs found guilty of fiddling are all Labour (Daily Telegraph)

The party may take the moral high ground, but lying and cheating are deep in its DNA, says Peter Oborne. 

3. Bernard Ingham says Northerners who loathe the Tories are ‘demented’. Perhaps I can put him straight... (Independent)

Slashing the welfare state and cutting taxes on the wealthy was never going to play well, says Owen Jones. 

4. This Pope is no liberal. He’s a true Catholic (Times)

Francis has won the Left’s admiration but this 'pro-lifer' opposes abortion as much as poverty, writes Tim Montgomerie. 

5. Accurate forecasts suit Osborne for once (Financial Times)

Expect a warts-and-all account of the OBR’s inability to see the recovery, says Chris Giles.

6. Has pride in public service had its day? (Daily Telegraph)

Ordinary people are being let down far too often by those who put their own interests first, says Sue Cameron.

7. China will keep its leaders busy (Financial Times)

They have set themselves a formidable task that will have far-reaching consequences, writes David Pilling. 

8. You can’t have an amnesty for murder (Times)

As Northern Ireland becomes increasingly like the rest of Europe it must observe the same legal principles, says David Aaronovitch.

9. The best healthcare delivery system in the world? Are you off your rocker? (Independent)

The Republicans are on a hot streak thanks to Obamacare's false start, writes David Usborne. 

10. JFK's assassination wasn't the end of anything, it just felt that way (Guardian)

Every generation has its Kennedy moments, writes Martin Kettle. From 9/11 to Iraq, history moves on.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.