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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour must step in to rescue a generation of doomed youth (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband wants to honour his promise to help the young, but it will not be cheap, says Mary Riddell. 

2. Why the future looks sluggish (Financial Times)

The glut of savings in leading economies has become a constraint on demand, writes Martin Wolf. 

3. Childcare – like life – is about so much more than economics (Guardian)

Miliband, Cameron and Clegg just don't get it: parents want options, and the recognition that there is more to life than money, says Zoe Williams. 

4. China’s reforms will help propel its economy to the top of the global league (Independent)

The shift in the one-child policy will have a profound social and economic effect, says Hamish McRae. 

5. A new generation of politicians is coming (Times)

Kennedy’s political generation shared values and experiences, writes Daniel Finkelstein. So did Clinton’s. Age can trump ideology.

6. The SNP has no Plan B (Financial Times)

We are being asked to give up the benefits of a full UK partnership, says Alistair Darling.

7. Bombs in Beirut are overspill from the conflict in Syria (Independent)

The war itself, and the vast refugee crisis, garner steadily less attention from the outside world, notes an Independent editorial. 

8. Our exploitative sexual culture must be resisted in the real world too (Guardian)

The internet's failings – the abuse, the hate, the ranting – are humanity's failings, and must be tackled face to face, says Jackie Ashley. 

9. Romanians are already here, being paid £30 a day (Times)

One way to reduce immigration would be to enforce the minimum wage properly, says Daniel Knowles.

10. The days of believing spy chiefs who say 'Trust us' are over (Guardian)

The world now faces total electronic penetration, with huge power to those who control it, writes Simon Jenkins. After Edward Snowden, we would be deluded to accept any assurances.