Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour must step in to rescue a generation of doomed youth (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband wants to honour his promise to help the young, but it will not be cheap, says Mary Riddell. 

2. Why the future looks sluggish (Financial Times)

The glut of savings in leading economies has become a constraint on demand, writes Martin Wolf. 

3. Childcare – like life – is about so much more than economics (Guardian)

Miliband, Cameron and Clegg just don't get it: parents want options, and the recognition that there is more to life than money, says Zoe Williams. 

4. China’s reforms will help propel its economy to the top of the global league (Independent)

The shift in the one-child policy will have a profound social and economic effect, says Hamish McRae. 

5. A new generation of politicians is coming (Times)

Kennedy’s political generation shared values and experiences, writes Daniel Finkelstein. So did Clinton’s. Age can trump ideology.

6. The SNP has no Plan B (Financial Times)

We are being asked to give up the benefits of a full UK partnership, says Alistair Darling.

7. Bombs in Beirut are overspill from the conflict in Syria (Independent)

The war itself, and the vast refugee crisis, garner steadily less attention from the outside world, notes an Independent editorial. 

8. Our exploitative sexual culture must be resisted in the real world too (Guardian)

The internet's failings – the abuse, the hate, the ranting – are humanity's failings, and must be tackled face to face, says Jackie Ashley. 

9. Romanians are already here, being paid £30 a day (Times)

One way to reduce immigration would be to enforce the minimum wage properly, says Daniel Knowles.

10. The days of believing spy chiefs who say 'Trust us' are over (Guardian)

The world now faces total electronic penetration, with huge power to those who control it, writes Simon Jenkins. After Edward Snowden, we would be deluded to accept any assurances.

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.