Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Slandering Britain's Roma isn't courageous. It's racist (Guardian)

The arrival of marginalised people is challenging not because of who they are, but because they are poor, writes Gary Younge.

2. The Obama presidency is failing (Financial Times)

With the exception of the debt ceiling debacle, he has fallen at almost every hurdle, says Edward Luce.

3. At last, a Plan B to stop global warming (Times)

Existing renewable energy hurts economies, writes Bjorn Lomborg. We should follow Japan and find cheaper forms of clean power.

4. 2014 is not 1914, but Europe is getting increasingly angry and nationalist (Guardian)

While Germany focuses on forging a government, populist anti-EU parties look set to do well at next year's elections, writes Timothy Garton Ash.

5. The real poison is to be found in Arafat's legacy (Independent)

He placed vain trust in Israel and the US - mistakes that his people are still paying for, writes Robert Fisk. 

6. The squeezed middle class also deserves a tax cut (Times)

Britain can’t win the global race if taxes remain such a burden, says Dominic Raab. 

7. Tory toff David Cameron's hollow talk of aspiration is falling flat in middle-income homes (Daily Mirror)

Call-me-Dave’s unclassy to urge people to dream as he entrenches division, says Kevin Maguire. 

8. We should be humbly thanking the super-rich, not bashing them (Daily Telegraph)

As well as creating jobs and giving to charity, the wealthy should be hailed as Tax Heroes, says Boris Johnson. 

9. Typhoon Haiyan must spur us on to slow climate change (Guardian)

The damage caused by extreme weather events bring home the need to curb carbon emissions and combat global warming, says Chris Huhne. 

10. Sykes and Ukip could put Labour into No 10 (Daily Telegraph)

Cameron should be wary of Ukip, says a Telegraph editorial. The 2015 election could be decided not by a clash with Labour but a feud within the right.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.