Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Slandering Britain's Roma isn't courageous. It's racist (Guardian)

The arrival of marginalised people is challenging not because of who they are, but because they are poor, writes Gary Younge.

2. The Obama presidency is failing (Financial Times)

With the exception of the debt ceiling debacle, he has fallen at almost every hurdle, says Edward Luce.

3. At last, a Plan B to stop global warming (Times)

Existing renewable energy hurts economies, writes Bjorn Lomborg. We should follow Japan and find cheaper forms of clean power.

4. 2014 is not 1914, but Europe is getting increasingly angry and nationalist (Guardian)

While Germany focuses on forging a government, populist anti-EU parties look set to do well at next year's elections, writes Timothy Garton Ash.

5. The real poison is to be found in Arafat's legacy (Independent)

He placed vain trust in Israel and the US - mistakes that his people are still paying for, writes Robert Fisk. 

6. The squeezed middle class also deserves a tax cut (Times)

Britain can’t win the global race if taxes remain such a burden, says Dominic Raab. 

7. Tory toff David Cameron's hollow talk of aspiration is falling flat in middle-income homes (Daily Mirror)

Call-me-Dave’s unclassy to urge people to dream as he entrenches division, says Kevin Maguire. 

8. We should be humbly thanking the super-rich, not bashing them (Daily Telegraph)

As well as creating jobs and giving to charity, the wealthy should be hailed as Tax Heroes, says Boris Johnson. 

9. Typhoon Haiyan must spur us on to slow climate change (Guardian)

The damage caused by extreme weather events bring home the need to curb carbon emissions and combat global warming, says Chris Huhne. 

10. Sykes and Ukip could put Labour into No 10 (Daily Telegraph)

Cameron should be wary of Ukip, says a Telegraph editorial. The 2015 election could be decided not by a clash with Labour but a feud within the right.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.