Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Slandering Britain's Roma isn't courageous. It's racist (Guardian)

The arrival of marginalised people is challenging not because of who they are, but because they are poor, writes Gary Younge.

2. The Obama presidency is failing (Financial Times)

With the exception of the debt ceiling debacle, he has fallen at almost every hurdle, says Edward Luce.

3. At last, a Plan B to stop global warming (Times)

Existing renewable energy hurts economies, writes Bjorn Lomborg. We should follow Japan and find cheaper forms of clean power.

4. 2014 is not 1914, but Europe is getting increasingly angry and nationalist (Guardian)

While Germany focuses on forging a government, populist anti-EU parties look set to do well at next year's elections, writes Timothy Garton Ash.

5. The real poison is to be found in Arafat's legacy (Independent)

He placed vain trust in Israel and the US - mistakes that his people are still paying for, writes Robert Fisk. 

6. The squeezed middle class also deserves a tax cut (Times)

Britain can’t win the global race if taxes remain such a burden, says Dominic Raab. 

7. Tory toff David Cameron's hollow talk of aspiration is falling flat in middle-income homes (Daily Mirror)

Call-me-Dave’s unclassy to urge people to dream as he entrenches division, says Kevin Maguire. 

8. We should be humbly thanking the super-rich, not bashing them (Daily Telegraph)

As well as creating jobs and giving to charity, the wealthy should be hailed as Tax Heroes, says Boris Johnson. 

9. Typhoon Haiyan must spur us on to slow climate change (Guardian)

The damage caused by extreme weather events bring home the need to curb carbon emissions and combat global warming, says Chris Huhne. 

10. Sykes and Ukip could put Labour into No 10 (Daily Telegraph)

Cameron should be wary of Ukip, says a Telegraph editorial. The 2015 election could be decided not by a clash with Labour but a feud within the right.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.