We're hiring! Be a digital sub-editor on NewStatesman.com

The NS website is looking for an enthusiastic, web-savvy sub.

Digital sub-editor  – newstatesman.com

The New Statesman is hiring a digital sub-editor, who will work on our website and digital editions.

This a full-time paid job based in our office in Blackfriars, with a salary to be determined depending on experience.

The successful candidate will be passionate and enthusiastic about how articles are presented, with a keen eye for an engaging headline. They will work primarily on newstatesman.com, subbing and uploading articles, writing SEO-friendly headlines and picture captions, as well as working on the New Statesman’s iPad app and Kindle editions. The position is a junior one on our expanding web desk, and would suit a sub-editor with some experience in online production.

The ideal candidate will:

-          Have excellent editing and fact-checking skills

-          Have a working knowledge of Search Engine Optimisation and writing headlines for the internet

-          Demonstrate the ability to work efficiently and without errors in a fast-paced environment

-          Have a background in sub-editing or production

-          Be passionate about the detail of how articles are presented

-          Be familiar with how to use a web content management system

-          Have some experience with using photo-editing software

Please apply with a CV and a covering letter to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis on helen[at]newstatesman[dot]co[dot]uk by Monday 14 October at 5pm. As part of your covering letter, please include a 200-word outline of how you think the presentation of articles on newstatesman.com could be improved. Please do not include large attachments with your email. 

NB Applications which do not follow this outline will not be considered. Please note that this is a production role, not a reporting or writing one.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.