WATCH: Russell Brand brings the message of revolution to Newsnight

Our guest editor is grilled by Paxman on Newsnight about the revolution he wants to see in British politics.

Russell Brand's interview with Jeremy Paxman on last night's Newsnight was a fiery affair, with the host interrogating Brand about his desire to see a "revolution" in society:

Paxman doggedly insisted that Brand's refusal to vote made his political views suspect. Brand, though, responded in style: "It’s not that I’m not voting out of apathy, I’m not voting out of absolute indifference and weariness and exhaustion from the lies, treachery and deceit of the political class which has been going on for generations now, and which has now reached fever pitch where you have a disenfranchised, disillusioned, despondent underclass that is not being represented by that political system, and voting is tacit complicity with that system."

However, a bad-tempered Paxman wasn't entirely on board with this, calling Brand "a very trivial man". To which Brand replied: "Trivial? A minute ago you were having a go at me because I want a revolution!"

The latest issue of the New Statesman is out now.

A clash between indifference and passion. (Screenshot: BBC Newsnight)
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.