Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. After this shadow cabinet reshuffle, we know what's in Ed Miliband's mind (Guardian)

The Labour leader has got what he wanted, says Polly Toynbee. No lurch to the left or right, but a team unafraid of the challenges ahead.

2. Getting giddy over shale won’t do much to keep the lights on (Daily Telegraph)

Yes, fracking has vast potential - but Britain's looming energy crunch is rather more pressing, says Benedict Brogan. 

3. America cannot live so carelessly forever (Financial Times)

Playing Russian roulette is never advisable, writes Gideon Rachman. Congress may find a bullet in the chamber this time.

4. The prejudice, fear and ignorance around Alan Sugar’s – and others’ – views on Chinese labour (Independent)

So the Chinese work harder than the rest of us,  right? Wrong, says Ben Chu. 

5. Ignore the press barons: a royal charter is not 'state regulation' (Guardian)

All being well, parliament's royal charter will get the final nod from the privy council this week, writes Hugh Grant. All those who believe in a free - and fair - press should welcome it.

6. A shuffled pack doesn’t make a winning hand (Times)

Cameron can’t rely on promoting token women and northerners to win over wavering voters, writes Rachel Sylvester. 

7. UK eurosceptics are not ready for a fight (Financial Times)

Haggling over process is a good way of not having to think about substance, says Janan Ganesh.

8. At last, Clegg is making the case for Britain in the EU - just the corrective needed to Tory Europhobia (Independent)

But it will be interesting to see where the Deputy PM's speech leaves Labour, says Donald Macintyre.

9. Does Britain need an FBI? (Daily Telegraph)

The launch of the National Crime Agency is more than a rebrand: it has significant new powers over local forces, writes Philip Johnston. 

10. The problem with education? Children aren't feral enough (Guardian)

The 10-year-old Londoners I took to Wales were proof that a week in the countryside is worth three months in a classroom, writes George Monbiot. 

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.