Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. After this shadow cabinet reshuffle, we know what's in Ed Miliband's mind (Guardian)

The Labour leader has got what he wanted, says Polly Toynbee. No lurch to the left or right, but a team unafraid of the challenges ahead.

2. Getting giddy over shale won’t do much to keep the lights on (Daily Telegraph)

Yes, fracking has vast potential - but Britain's looming energy crunch is rather more pressing, says Benedict Brogan. 

3. America cannot live so carelessly forever (Financial Times)

Playing Russian roulette is never advisable, writes Gideon Rachman. Congress may find a bullet in the chamber this time.

4. The prejudice, fear and ignorance around Alan Sugar’s – and others’ – views on Chinese labour (Independent)

So the Chinese work harder than the rest of us,  right? Wrong, says Ben Chu. 

5. Ignore the press barons: a royal charter is not 'state regulation' (Guardian)

All being well, parliament's royal charter will get the final nod from the privy council this week, writes Hugh Grant. All those who believe in a free - and fair - press should welcome it.

6. A shuffled pack doesn’t make a winning hand (Times)

Cameron can’t rely on promoting token women and northerners to win over wavering voters, writes Rachel Sylvester. 

7. UK eurosceptics are not ready for a fight (Financial Times)

Haggling over process is a good way of not having to think about substance, says Janan Ganesh.

8. At last, Clegg is making the case for Britain in the EU - just the corrective needed to Tory Europhobia (Independent)

But it will be interesting to see where the Deputy PM's speech leaves Labour, says Donald Macintyre.

9. Does Britain need an FBI? (Daily Telegraph)

The launch of the National Crime Agency is more than a rebrand: it has significant new powers over local forces, writes Philip Johnston. 

10. The problem with education? Children aren't feral enough (Guardian)

The 10-year-old Londoners I took to Wales were proof that a week in the countryside is worth three months in a classroom, writes George Monbiot. 

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The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

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