Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Anything makes more sense than the HS2 fiasco (Guardian)

Tories can blame Labour for the line's demise, use the billions on other rail and road links – and reap a publicity bonanza, writes Simon Jenkins. 

2. The Big Six: This was supposed to be a grilling, but even Russell Brand would have struggled to give one (Independent)

Nationalising the energy industry will not make electricity bills magically cheaper, writes John Rentoul. 

3. Bank of England’s Mark Carney places a bet on big finance (Financial Times)

The governor has opted for boldness at a time when caution might be a safer course, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Labour has its sights trained on the laurel hedges of the suburbs (Daily Telegraph)

Miliband's party is targeting all its resources at a small group of voters who can swing the general election vote, says Mary Riddell. 

5. Europe is still bugged by weak leadership (Times)

EU  leaders hope that the worst is over but the continent’s economic and demographic problems persist, writes Roger Boyes.

6. Private schools are blocking social mobility (Daily Telegraph)

Their education is so good that it is stopping downward mobility of the dim and indolent, says David Kynaston.

7. The grip of privatisation on our vital services has to be broken (Guardian)

From Ineos to energy, vested interests are driving a 30-year failed experiment, says Seumas Milne. Utilities belong in public hands.

8. Oh no, the U.S. has dropped us in it again (Daily Mail)

By tapping the phones of its allies’ leaders, the US is guilty of a grave diplomatic insult, says Andrew Alexander. 

9. The reality of UK’s nuclear power failure (Financial Times)

The switch that was flicked in 1956 activated a period of commercial calamity, writes John Kay. 

10. Progress involves 51% success and 49% error (Times)

Individuals, businesses and nations only move forwards if they take risks that sometimes go wrong, writes Alice Thomson. 

Jeremy Corbyn, Labour leader. Getty
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Can Jeremy Corbyn win the 2017 general election?

Does the Labour leader have a chance of becoming prime minister?

 

After less than two years as Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn is leading the party into a snap general election. This isn’t the first vote of national significance since his election, however, since he was in office during the 2016 EU referendum.

It’s also not his first serious challenge: after the Brexit vote, his MPs voted “no confidence” in him and Owen Smith challenged him for the leadership. Corbyn saw off that threat to his position convincingly, so can he pull out another electoral triumph and become prime minister?

Can Jeremy Corbyn become prime minister? The polls

Since May 2015, the Conservative Party has consistently led in the polls. The latest polls gives Labour ratings in the mid-20s, while the Conservatives are on the mid-40s – numbers which, if borne out at the polls, would give Labour its worst result since 1935.

But should we believe the general election polls? Glen O’Hara, professor of modern and contemporary history at Oxford Brookes University, points out that the polls have been wrong before, and could be overstating Labour’s collapse. However, a 20-point gap is far outside the margin of error. A Corbyn win would be an unprecedented upset.

Can Jeremy Corbyn become prime minister? Electoral record

At the 2016 local elections, Labour did not gain any councils and lost 18 seats and 4% of the vote. James Schneider, the co-founder of Momentum who is now Corbyn’s head of strategic communications, said this showed Labour was on the right trajectory, but it’s a disappointment for an opposition to make no gains. And at the Copeland by-election this February, Labour lost the seat to the Tories – the first government gain in a by-election since 1982.

Can  Jeremy Corbyn become prime minister? The verdict

Jeremy Corbyn’s path to power would be one of the greatest surprises in British politics. But unlikely doesn’t mean impossible. It would take some extraordinary events, but it could happen. Check out the latest odds to see how the markets rate his chances.

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