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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Anything makes more sense than the HS2 fiasco (Guardian)

Tories can blame Labour for the line's demise, use the billions on other rail and road links – and reap a publicity bonanza, writes Simon Jenkins. 

2. The Big Six: This was supposed to be a grilling, but even Russell Brand would have struggled to give one (Independent)

Nationalising the energy industry will not make electricity bills magically cheaper, writes John Rentoul. 

3. Bank of England’s Mark Carney places a bet on big finance (Financial Times)

The governor has opted for boldness at a time when caution might be a safer course, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Labour has its sights trained on the laurel hedges of the suburbs (Daily Telegraph)

Miliband's party is targeting all its resources at a small group of voters who can swing the general election vote, says Mary Riddell. 

5. Europe is still bugged by weak leadership (Times)

EU  leaders hope that the worst is over but the continent’s economic and demographic problems persist, writes Roger Boyes.

6. Private schools are blocking social mobility (Daily Telegraph)

Their education is so good that it is stopping downward mobility of the dim and indolent, says David Kynaston.

7. The grip of privatisation on our vital services has to be broken (Guardian)

From Ineos to energy, vested interests are driving a 30-year failed experiment, says Seumas Milne. Utilities belong in public hands.

8. Oh no, the U.S. has dropped us in it again (Daily Mail)

By tapping the phones of its allies’ leaders, the US is guilty of a grave diplomatic insult, says Andrew Alexander. 

9. The reality of UK’s nuclear power failure (Financial Times)

The switch that was flicked in 1956 activated a period of commercial calamity, writes John Kay. 

10. Progress involves 51% success and 49% error (Times)

Individuals, businesses and nations only move forwards if they take risks that sometimes go wrong, writes Alice Thomson.