Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Anything makes more sense than the HS2 fiasco (Guardian)

Tories can blame Labour for the line's demise, use the billions on other rail and road links – and reap a publicity bonanza, writes Simon Jenkins. 

2. The Big Six: This was supposed to be a grilling, but even Russell Brand would have struggled to give one (Independent)

Nationalising the energy industry will not make electricity bills magically cheaper, writes John Rentoul. 

3. Bank of England’s Mark Carney places a bet on big finance (Financial Times)

The governor has opted for boldness at a time when caution might be a safer course, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Labour has its sights trained on the laurel hedges of the suburbs (Daily Telegraph)

Miliband's party is targeting all its resources at a small group of voters who can swing the general election vote, says Mary Riddell. 

5. Europe is still bugged by weak leadership (Times)

EU  leaders hope that the worst is over but the continent’s economic and demographic problems persist, writes Roger Boyes.

6. Private schools are blocking social mobility (Daily Telegraph)

Their education is so good that it is stopping downward mobility of the dim and indolent, says David Kynaston.

7. The grip of privatisation on our vital services has to be broken (Guardian)

From Ineos to energy, vested interests are driving a 30-year failed experiment, says Seumas Milne. Utilities belong in public hands.

8. Oh no, the U.S. has dropped us in it again (Daily Mail)

By tapping the phones of its allies’ leaders, the US is guilty of a grave diplomatic insult, says Andrew Alexander. 

9. The reality of UK’s nuclear power failure (Financial Times)

The switch that was flicked in 1956 activated a period of commercial calamity, writes John Kay. 

10. Progress involves 51% success and 49% error (Times)

Individuals, businesses and nations only move forwards if they take risks that sometimes go wrong, writes Alice Thomson. 

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The House of Lords must give EU citizens the right to remain

The government has used more than 3m UK residents as pawns. But the Lords could put a stop to it. 

Theresa May, David Davies and Boris Johnson like playing games. They are well versed in moving around a board, measuring their opponents and using pawns to lure them in.

It is a great relief, then, that the House of Lords are expected to put an end to the game the government is so desperate to play, and stop it from using people as pieces in a negotiation. 

It is my hope the Lords will do this by tabling an amendment to unilaterally secure the rights of EU nationals living in the UK, forcing the House of Commons to think once again.

It will be a welcome move by the Lords, with the country once again relying on an extra level of scrutiny to make sure the government's reckless actions do not risk ruining the lives of people who have lived here for decades.

And if the Lords do so, it will be to support the will of the people: an ICM poll after the referendum found some 84 per cent of British people support letting EU migrants stay, including 77 per cent of Leave voters. And a more recent Opinium poll found that only five per cent of Britons think EU nationals currently living in the UK should be asked to leave.

But those who lead us into the biggest negotiations of our time have said they simply cannot guarantee the rights of more than 3m EU citizens living in the UK until the rights of the 1.2m British citizens in the EU are reciprocated.

Constituents tell me they fear a situation where the government sits contemplating the different ways it can implement its policy of mass deportations.

Indeed, millions of people who are active in our communities and play a vital role in the economy are now worried about exactly that. My own constituents - and those of my colleagues in Westminster - are scared their lives will be torn apart if the government is not given a reciprocal gesture of goodwill.

Migrants make up 10.9 per cent of the workforce. These are people who have added to the sciences, to innovation, to the NHS and social care. These are people, not collateral.

Not only immoral, this approach seems fundamentally flawed. Would it not, as our Prime Minister said, be a good thing to approach the negotiations as friends with our European neighbours? Would it, therefore, not be the greatest gesture of friendship to afford EU citizens their right to reside in the UK at the soonest possible opportunity?

Already a leaked document has indicated the government’s approach making it difficult for EU nationals in the UK to acquire permanent residence is likely to mean British nationals living on the continent can expect a backlash of their own.

So, as the government prepares to quash any amendments proposed by the Lords to its bill, the onus will shift onto MPs on all sides of the house to accept this crucial amendment. 

Before the next vote Democratic Unionist Party and Conservative politicians must all ask themselves, are they happy to use people as “negotiating capital”?

Catherine West is the Labour MP for Hornsey and Wood Green.