Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain's railways have become mere outposts of other nations' empires (Guardian)

Travel chaos is the least of our problems, says John Harris. An industry that once embodied national pride has been sold for other states to benefit.

2. No end to the euro crisis in sight (Financial Times)

The scale of the required adjustment is enormous and the IMF does not believe it will happen, says Wolfgang Münchau.

3. Educating Yorkshire can teach Michael Gove something about teachers (Daily Mirror)

When Gove has seen Mr Burton help cure young Mushy’s stammer, he should have the guts to apologise to our teachers, says Kevin Maguire. 

4. Green taxes will cut our bills as well as saving energy (Guardian)

By encouraging the energy companies to diversify away from fossil fuels, we'll be able to save £166 per year by 2020, writes Chris Huhne.

5. Obamacare glitches are no mere hiccup (Financial Times)

The US president has been caught serially off guard by recent crises, from Syria to spying, writes Edward Luce.

6. The Grangemouth dispute makes it clear who really runs the country (Independent)

Employers have used the financial crisis to strip workers of security, rights and power, says Owen Jones

7. They’re playing politics with progress (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's dithering over the HS2 project bears all the hallmarks of a classic Westminster fudge, says Dan Hodges. And that's just what the party wants.

8. The flood of 1914-18 memorabilia has begun – and it will break your heart (Independent)

A pan-European digital library has collected 500,000 mementos, writes Robert Fisk.

9. United Nations: in our common interest (Guardian)

If we want to make a better job of life on the planet, we should try harder to make a greater success of the UN, says a Guardian editorial.

10. Let the public see the crowning glory of our heritage (Times)

Displaying the Royal Collection at St James’s Palace would enrich London culturally and economically, writes Andrew Adonis.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.