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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain's railways have become mere outposts of other nations' empires (Guardian)

Travel chaos is the least of our problems, says John Harris. An industry that once embodied national pride has been sold for other states to benefit.

2. No end to the euro crisis in sight (Financial Times)

The scale of the required adjustment is enormous and the IMF does not believe it will happen, says Wolfgang Münchau.

3. Educating Yorkshire can teach Michael Gove something about teachers (Daily Mirror)

When Gove has seen Mr Burton help cure young Mushy’s stammer, he should have the guts to apologise to our teachers, says Kevin Maguire. 

4. Green taxes will cut our bills as well as saving energy (Guardian)

By encouraging the energy companies to diversify away from fossil fuels, we'll be able to save £166 per year by 2020, writes Chris Huhne.

5. Obamacare glitches are no mere hiccup (Financial Times)

The US president has been caught serially off guard by recent crises, from Syria to spying, writes Edward Luce.

6. The Grangemouth dispute makes it clear who really runs the country (Independent)

Employers have used the financial crisis to strip workers of security, rights and power, says Owen Jones

7. They’re playing politics with progress (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's dithering over the HS2 project bears all the hallmarks of a classic Westminster fudge, says Dan Hodges. And that's just what the party wants.

8. The flood of 1914-18 memorabilia has begun – and it will break your heart (Independent)

A pan-European digital library has collected 500,000 mementos, writes Robert Fisk.

9. United Nations: in our common interest (Guardian)

If we want to make a better job of life on the planet, we should try harder to make a greater success of the UN, says a Guardian editorial.

10. Let the public see the crowning glory of our heritage (Times)

Displaying the Royal Collection at St James’s Palace would enrich London culturally and economically, writes Andrew Adonis.

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