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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The humbling of David Cameron: This outbreak of petulance may cost the PM dearly (Independent)

The PM was stung into revealing a side of his personality that he has kept hidden, writes John Rentoul.

2. Simon Stevens, new head of NHS England, is in for a rude awakening (Guardian)

Under Labour, Stevens began the culture of competition in health, writes Polly Toynbee. He will now find out just how perverse this has become.

3. Why the BoE must gamble on growth (Financial Times)

The job of policy makers is to shift the economy on to a better path, writes Martin Wolf. This means taking risks.

4. The power companies are not the bad guys (Daily Telegraph)

Britain's 'energy debate' is populist nonsense - as are price freezes and windfall taxes, says Jeremy Warner.

5. Poorly executed and wrongly priced - the betrayal of the Royal Mail flotation (Daily Mail)

The government didn’t want a flop on its hands and allowed the offer to be 'priced to go', writes Alex Brummer. The misjudgement was huge.

6. If Britain leaves Europe, Scotland leaves Britain (Financial Times)

Scots who support the union will have second thoughts if England heads for the door, says Philip Stephens.

7. Nick Clegg is rejecting liberalism just as the Conservatives are embracing it (Daily Telegraph)

A new generation of voters is associating radical politics with the PM, not his deputy, says Fraser Nelson. 

8. Pain, passion and empathy – what I've learned about peacemaking (Guardian)

From Northern Ireland to the Middle East, to end long-running conflicts, mediators have to absorb the hurt of both sides, says Tony Blair.

9. Cop-cameras won’t rebuild trust in the police (Times)

Filming every encounter will make officers more defensive and members of the public less candid, writes Philip Collins. 

10. Owen Paterson: the minister for GM hype (Guardian)

The environment secretary's stance on GM food is grotesque, says Zac Goldsmith. It would be wicked not to question the industry's motives.