Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Sir John Major has broken his silence – let’s hope the party is listening (Daily Telegraph)

The former PM wants less 'ideology’ and more talk about what matters to ordinary people, writes Peter Oborne. 

2. It's not all immigrants who the Tories fear. It's the mobile poor (Guardian)

The real aim of recent policies is to segregate belonging according to income, writes Zoe Williams. The more you earn, the more rights you have.

3. Drone strikes set a dangerous precedent (Financial Times)

A nation at war with an abstract threat has no right to mount a pre-emptive killing spree, says David Pilling. 

4. Osborne is best when he’s most unpopular (Times)

There is a Bad Osbo who obsesses about political tactics and a Good Osbo who takes long-term decisions, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. Grangemouth could help shape the Scottish referendum (Guardian)

The SNP has cast itself as defender of the economy from the icy wind of global markets, writes Martin Kettle. What's icier than closure on the Forth?

6. Oil and troubled waters for Alex Salmond (Daily Telegraph)

The closure of Scotland’s sole refinery would be a body-blow to the SNP’s dream of independence, says Alan Cochrane.

7. John Major's snide attack on the PM over fuel prices was as flawed as his six disastrous years in Number 10 (Daily Mail)

The more one re-reads Sir John’s words, the more they read like a calculated act of treacher, says Simon Heffer. 

8. Cameron must stop Europe’s latest assault on Britain (Times)

New regulations on technology are utter madness, writes Rohan Silva. 

9. The Prime Minister is in a bind over energy prices, but cutting green levies is no way out (Independent)

Cameron has sounded the death knell of his once-vaunted green conservatism, says an Independent leader.

10. Companies must adapt to new rules (Financial Times)

Banks and utilities need to make their case, be open and look beyond immediate troubles, writes John Gapper.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"