The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The debt-ceiling doomsday device (Financial Times)

The ceiling is so dangerous because Obama could not obey it in a non-destructive way, writes Martin Wolf.

2. Britain doesn’t just need new homes, it needs whole new towns (Daily Telegraph)

Whoever looks like solving the housing crisis will probably win the next election, says Mary Riddell.

3. 'Plebgate’ threatens the reputation of the police (Daily Telegraph)

Andrew Mitchell's case must be reopened, says a Telegraph editorial.

4. Is Cameron insane? Leave foxhunting alone (Times)

The Tories should focus on the real challenges facing the countryside, including deep rural poverty, writes Alice Thomson.

5. An early EU referendum is so tempting – but Miliband must not be moved (Guardian)

Europe now poses a major dilemma for the Labour leader, writes Jackie Ashley. But to promise a referendum would result in a post-election defeat for him, and a UK exit.

6. Give a warm welcome to China, our new best friend (Independent)

The US dominance of the past century will soon be coming to an end, writes Hamish McRae.

7. Americans need to discover how the world sees them (Guardian)

There's little awareness of how the budget crisis has eroded US credibility, writes Timothy Garton Ash. It's time for a reverse Christopher Columbus.

8. Never empower people who hate freedom (Times)

Restrictions on free speech nearly always spread, becoming tools of the intolerant and the illiberal, says Daniel Finkelstein. 

9. Politics and security: a pressing need for action (Guardian)

The security services enjoy a degree of autonomy that exceeds what many MPs and ministers would judge appropriate, says a Guardian editorial.

10. Our leaders have always misled us about the EU (Independent)

Governments were intent on shielding voters from understanding how much sovereignty we had lost, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.