Morning Call: pick of the paper

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In Theresa May's surreal world, feelings trump facts (Observer)

The home secretary's claims about health tourists are both wrong and an insult to voters, says Nick Cohen.

2. We need the spirit of the eighties (Sunday Times)

The Times dons its leader cap to applaud the sale of Royal Mail and hope for further sell-offs.

3. The BBC foists on us a skewed version of reality (Telegraph on Sunday)

The news media are engaged in a political argument about whether the purpose of journalism is to report the world as it is or to purvey an idealised view, writes Janet Daley.

4. Like Assad, Churchill liked to stockpile poison gas (Independent on Sunday)

World View: The prime minister meant to spray German troops if they landed on British beaches.

5. Malala: remember the young girl behind the public persona (Observer)

With her huge intelligence and courage it's easy to forget that she is still a teenager. Let's give her space to grow, says Catherine Bennett.

6. Scalpel slowly replaces chequebook in the Westminster weaponry (Sunday Times)

The Royal Mail flotation is a neat reminder that capitalism can work for the little guy, writes Camilla Cavendish.

7. There's a patriotic case for renationalising our railways (Telegraph on Sunday)

They're 'private', but massively subsidised, and you need to be a maths genius to work out the fare system.

8. Ed Miliband's preparing to serve two terms. In opposition (Independent on Sunday)

The Shadow Cabinet reshuffle wasn't just a cull of the Blairites, it was the suppression of the Ballsites too, says John Rentoul.

9. The age of insomnia with the internet and 24-hour news will be the death of us (Telegraph on Sunday)

The world makes no distinction between day and night, but we need sleep to stay sane, writes Jenny McCartney.

10. Should France follow our lead on Sunday trading? (Observer)

France is considering a relaxation of Sunday trading laws, as the UK did 20 years ago. Was it a change for the better?

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Ed Miliband is interviewing David Miliband on the Jeremy Vine show

Sibling rivalry hits the radio.

David was the chosen one, the protege, the man destined to lead the Labour party. 

But instead his awkward younger brother committed the ultimate sibling betrayal by winning the Labour party leadership election instead.

Not only that, but he lost the 2015 general election, and between those two dates, tinkered with the leadership election rules in a way that ultimately led to Jeremy Corbyn's victory

It seems, though, radio can bring these two men of thwarted ambition together.

Your Mole can reveal that Ed Miliband will interview his brother on the Jeremy Vine show, at 1pm during the two-hour show, which starts at 12.

But David, who is president of the International Rescue Committee, is there to discuss something more serious than family drama - his recent TED talk about the refugee crisis.  

Although the Mole understands that although the Miliband brothers will reunite on air, they will still be separated by the body of water that is the Atlantic Ocean...

I'm a mole, innit.

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