Morning Call: pick of the paper

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In Theresa May's surreal world, feelings trump facts (Observer)

The home secretary's claims about health tourists are both wrong and an insult to voters, says Nick Cohen.

2. We need the spirit of the eighties (Sunday Times)

The Times dons its leader cap to applaud the sale of Royal Mail and hope for further sell-offs.

3. The BBC foists on us a skewed version of reality (Telegraph on Sunday)

The news media are engaged in a political argument about whether the purpose of journalism is to report the world as it is or to purvey an idealised view, writes Janet Daley.

4. Like Assad, Churchill liked to stockpile poison gas (Independent on Sunday)

World View: The prime minister meant to spray German troops if they landed on British beaches.

5. Malala: remember the young girl behind the public persona (Observer)

With her huge intelligence and courage it's easy to forget that she is still a teenager. Let's give her space to grow, says Catherine Bennett.

6. Scalpel slowly replaces chequebook in the Westminster weaponry (Sunday Times)

The Royal Mail flotation is a neat reminder that capitalism can work for the little guy, writes Camilla Cavendish.

7. There's a patriotic case for renationalising our railways (Telegraph on Sunday)

They're 'private', but massively subsidised, and you need to be a maths genius to work out the fare system.

8. Ed Miliband's preparing to serve two terms. In opposition (Independent on Sunday)

The Shadow Cabinet reshuffle wasn't just a cull of the Blairites, it was the suppression of the Ballsites too, says John Rentoul.

9. The age of insomnia with the internet and 24-hour news will be the death of us (Telegraph on Sunday)

The world makes no distinction between day and night, but we need sleep to stay sane, writes Jenny McCartney.

10. Should France follow our lead on Sunday trading? (Observer)

France is considering a relaxation of Sunday trading laws, as the UK did 20 years ago. Was it a change for the better?

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496