New Statesman events at Labour conference 2013

What to look out for in Brighton, including events with Chuka Umunna, Rachel Reeves, Andy Burnham, Sadiq Khan, Diane Abbott and Lord Adonis.

All events are free to attend and open to the public.

Sunday 22 September

Chuka Umunna MP in conversation with New Statesman

Chuka Umunna MP, Shadow Business Secretary

12:30-1:30pm, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Diane Abbott MP in conversation with New Statesman

Diane Abbott MP, Shadow Public Health Minister

2-3pm, Wordsworth room, Thistle Hotel

Why invest in UK life sciences?

Shabanna Mahmood MP, Shadow Science and Higher Education Minister

5:30-6pm, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Smart Grids: Is this the way of selling low carbon policies to sceptics?

Tom Greatex MP, Shadow Energy and Climate Change Minister

5:30-6:30pm, Wordsworth room, Thistle Hotel

Home Front: The battle for a sustainable housing market

(invite only)

Jack Dromey MP, Shadow Housing Minister

8-9:30pm, Hall 7 Room D, The Hilton

Monday 23 September

What next for the criminal justice system?

Rt. Hon Sadiq Khan MP, Shadow Lord Chancellor, Shadow Justice Secretary and Shadow London Minister

9-10am, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Where now for aid to Syria and what role for Britain?

Rushanara Ali MP, Shadow International Development Minister

5:30-6:30pm, The Sandringham room, The Hilton

Could aid be effective without advocacy?

Cathy Jamieson MP, Shadow Economic Secretary to the Treasury

Rt. Hon Peter Hain MP

5:30-7pm, Wordsworth room, Thistle Hotel

Jobs for young people: how do we solve the problem?

Lord Adonis, Shadow Infrastructure Minister and former Transport Secretary

5:30-6:30pm, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Rachel Reeves MP in conversation with New Statesman

Rachel Reeves MP, Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury

7:15-8pm, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Tuesday 24 September

Innovation: what does the NHS need to do?

Andrew Gynne MP, Shadow Health Minister

8:30-9:30am, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Is integration enough to save the NHS?

Rt. Hon Andy Burnham MP, Shadow Health Secretary

12-1pm, Wordsworth room, Thistle Hotel

Will competition and choice open up the banking sector?

Chris Leslie MP, Shadow Financial Secretary to the Treasury

4:45-5:45pm, Wordsworth room, Thistle Hotel

Is a cap on immigration a cap on growth?

Chris Bryant MP, Shadow Immigration Minister

5:30-6:30pm, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

Wednesday 25 September

From prevention to survival: the cancer pathway at every step

Lord Hunt, Shadow Health Spokesperson

9-10am, Tennyson room, Thistle Hotel

A workman fixes a Labour Party Conference banner to a fence outside the conference centre on September 21, 2013 in Brighton. Photograph: Getty Images.
Photo: Getty
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.