Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Nick Clegg has served his party well and deserves to survive (Daily Telegraph)

The Lib Dems embody two contradictory factions, one of which may turn on its leader, says Peter Oborne.

2. This crisis resolves little in Syria but says a lot about the United States (Guardian)

The nation is sick and tired of foreign wars, and may never play its role of global anchor again, writes Timothy Garton Ash. We may live to regret it.

3. Take note, Ed Miliband: Starting a fight doesn’t make you strong (Independent)

I cannot understand how inciting fury is in itself an act of good leadership, says Steve Richards.

4. Politicians to blame for BBC infighting (Financial Times)

The UK’s public broadcaster has to be bold or it is pointless, says John Gapper.

5. Let's open our borders to Syria's refugees (Independent)

Britain is one of the world’s wealthiest nations, we should set an example, says Ian Birrell. 

6. Bedroom tax? It's not a policy but the product of a Bad Bullingdon Weekend (Guardian)

Did its devisers imagine a utopia without the UN, judicial review, and the state, asks Zoe Williams. They exist, and ultimately answer to voters.

7. We can’t stop the world, we can’t get off (Times)

Anti-intervention, anti-immigration, anti-aid, writes David Aaronovitch. It’s a fantasy to think we can turn our backs on the planet.

8. The great Liberal Democrat wipeout? I have a hunch it won't happen (Guardian)

Clegg's party may have to fight the equivalent of 57 Eastleighs in 2015 – but they are confident that they can defy the polls, writes Martin Kettle.

The new PM should aim for a smarter state, not radical reform, says an FT editorial.

10. Is the Foreign Office fighting for Britain? (Times)

An open letter to William Hague: your department’s EU review is a whitewash, says John Redwood.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.